African Americans African Americans

Arlington, Mass., Police Chief Fred Ryan (right) and Inspector Gina Bassett review toxicology reports on cocaine evidence looking for the possibility of fentanyl. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Fentanyl-Laced Cocaine Becoming A Deadly Problem Among Drug Users

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Ifeolu Claytor, 23, (right) and Gabrielle Jackson, 28, (far left) check out a social media voting video on Esosa Osa's phone. All three are members of the Northeast Ohio Young Black Democrats. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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Black Voters Need More Convincing From Democrats In 2018

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Workers pull pipes from an oil well in 2016 near Crescent, Okla. The oil industry wants to attract a new, more diverse generation of workers, but a history of racism and sexism makes that difficult. J Pat Carter/Getty Images hide caption

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J Pat Carter/Getty Images

Big Oil Has A Diversity Problem

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In her San Francisco home, NeDina Brocks-Capla has made a shrine filled with memories of son Kareem Jones, who died of sickle cell disease in 2013. Jenny Gold/KHN hide caption

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Sickle Cell Patients Endure Discrimination, Poor Care And Shortened Lives

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Phillip Thompson is a Gulf War veteran and a lawyer with his own practice. When he moved to his exclusive Leesburg, Va., enclave more than a decade ago, many of his mostly white neighbors assumed he had to be a professional athlete to afford his home. Brakkton Booker/NPR hide caption

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Brakkton Booker/NPR

Money May Not Shield Prosperous Blacks From Bigotry, Survey Says

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One of Twitty's projects is his "Southern Discomfort Tour" — a journey through the "forgotten little Africa" of the Old South. He picks cotton, chops wood, works in rice fields and cooks for audiences in plantation kitchens while dressed in slave clothing to recreate what his ancestors had to endure. Courtesy of Michael Twitty hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael Twitty

New research finds that African-Americans who grow up in harsh environments and endure stressful experiences are much more likely to develop Alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Leland Bobbe/Getty Images hide caption

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Stress And Poverty May Explain High Rates Of Dementia In African-Americans

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A comprehensive study of air pollution in the U.S. finds it still kills thousands a year, and disproportionately affects poor people and minorities. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Air Pollution Still Kills Thousands Every Year, Study Concludes

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Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Edward Albee in 1965. Jack Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Mitchell/Getty Images

Who's Afraid Of A Diverse Cast?

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