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Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch speaks at a June 22 news conference in Washington. Allison Shelley/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Shelley/Getty Images

Attorney General Loretta Lynch, Bill Clinton Met Amid Email Investigation

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House Benghazi Committee Chairman Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C. (left), confers with the committee's ranking member Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., during a hearing on Capitol Hill. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (left) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren wave to the crowd before a campaign rally at the Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal on Monday. John Sommers II/Getty Images hide caption

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John Sommers II/Getty Images

Elizabeth Warren speaks at the Democratic National Convention on Sept. 5, 2012, in Charlotte, N.C. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Sen. Elizabeth Warren: From Professor To Pugilist

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Rep. Gwen Moore (shown in 2012) has introduced a bill that would mandate drug testing for wealthy Americans before they could claim itemized tax deductions over $150,000. She says the bill is intended not so much as a statement about the rich but about the poor. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Jimmy Stewart in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. Herbert Dorfman/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Herbert Dorfman/Corbis via Getty Images

Senate Gun Control Speeches Recall An Old-School Filibuster

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President Obama (L) and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) both responded to Donald Trump's comments on terrorism and gun control on Tuesday. (L) Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images and (R) Jeff Swensen/Getty Images) hide caption

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(L) Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images and (R) Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)

Hillary Clinton smiles at the crowd at the start of her remarks during a primary night rally Brooklyn, N.Y. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton Speaks To NPR About President Obama's Endorsement

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Hillary Clinton delivers a national-security speech at Balboa Park in San Diego, Calif., Thursday. The speech was an indictment of Republican Donald Trump's candidacy. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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