UAW UAW
Stories About

UAW

A member of the United Auto Workers pickets earlier this month outside a General Motors facility in Langhorne, Pa. On Friday the union's members voted to ratify a tentative deal with the automaker, bringing an end to a national strike that lasted 40 days. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Rourke/AP

United Auto Workers members picket Wednesday at a General Motors plant in Flint, Mich. Last year, more U.S. workers went on strike than at any time since 1986. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

'It's Time To Get Something Back': Union Workers' Voices Are Getting Louder

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/772760183/772775890" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The UAW GM National Council will vote on a new tentative deal Thursday in a potential end to the national strike that has idled GM plants. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Many of the workers for businesses that supply GM are out of work, too, because of the UAW strike. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Sancya/AP

GM Suppliers Hurting From Autoworkers Strike, Too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/768247108/768489417" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

United Auto Workers President Gary Jones speaks in Detroit on July 16. The FBI is investigating allegations that Jones and other UAW officials accepted bribes. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Sancya/AP

United Auto Workers President Dennis Williams (from left), Ford Motor Co. President and CEO Mark Fields and Ford Executive Chairman William Clay Ford Jr. at the opening of contract negotiations last July in Detroit. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Sancya/AP

At Southern Factory, Workers Try Again To Unionize

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/442529513/442582520" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Workers assemble Volkswagen Passat sedans at the German automaker's plant in Chattanooga, Tenn., on June 12, 2013. The automaker announced a new policy Wednesday that would allow interaction with labor unions at the plant. Erik Schelzig/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Erik Schelzig/AP

Volkswagen's car plant in Chattanooga, Tenn., is the company's only one in the U.S. Its employees voted this week on whether to join the United Auto Workers union. Volkswagen hide caption

toggle caption
Volkswagen

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14691756/14692393" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">