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Then-U.S. Senate candidate Rep. Beto O'Rourke (D-Texas) poses with members of a mariachi band during an October 2018 campaign rally in San Antonio, Texas. O'Rourke is one of a score of Democratic politicians talking more explicitly about issues of race than previous generations of Democrats. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri characterized her 2018 electoral defeat as a "failure" of the Democratic Party "to gain enough trust with rural Americans." Cameron Pollack/NPR hide caption

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Cameron Pollack/NPR

McCaskill Blames Senate Defeat On Democratic 'Failure' With Rural America

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Possible Democratic presidential candidates for the 2020 race include Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders (left), New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke and California Sen. Kamala Harris. Jeff J. Mitchell, Angela Weiss/AFP, Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J. Mitchell, Angela Weiss/AFP, Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Yes, It's Almost Decision Time For 2020 Democratic Presidential Hopefuls

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Tony Evers, Democratic candidate for governor of Wisconsin, faced a primary opponent who was further left and does not take up all the far-reaching policy positions of Bernie Sanders. But he has embraced the progressive banner, and Sanders has his back in a campaign to unseat GOP Gov. Scott Walker. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

As More Democrats Embrace 'Progressive' Label, It May Not Mean What It Used To

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Democratic U.S. House candidate Andrew Janz raised more than $4 million in three months as part of his effort to unseat U.S. Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif.), part of a wave of record-breaking fundraising hauls by Democratic candidates. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Former U.S. President Barack Obama, attends the Nordic Business Forum business seminar in Helsinki, Finland last month. Obama has endorsed more than 300 candidates running for office in this year's midterm elections. Jussi Nukari/AP hide caption

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Jussi Nukari/AP

Chris Pappas participates in a debate of Democratic hopefuls in New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District at St. Anselm College in Manchester, N.H., earlier this month. Pappas won the Tuesday, Sept. 11, Democratic primary and will represent his party in the November general election. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

"I think we all still have PTSD from 2016," says Raffi Krikorian, chief technology officer at the Democratic National Committee, referring to the massive hack of DNC emails at a pivotal moment in the presidential election. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez appears on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert in June. CBS Photo Archive/CBS via Getty Images hide caption

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CBS Photo Archive/CBS via Getty Images

What You Need To Know About The Democratic Socialists Of America

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Rep. Mike Capuano struggles to understand why some voters think race and gender are relevant in this race. When Capuano campaigns, he doesn't talk much about his opponent, focusing on his own record. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/NPR

Democratic House nominee Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's progressive agenda clashes with the centrist campaigns championed by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer. Rep. Conor Lamb's special election victory was built on a low-key centrist platform. Mark Lennihan/AP; Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images; Mark Wilson/Getty Images; Alex Brandon/ AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP; Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images; Mark Wilson/Getty Images; Alex Brandon/ AP

For Democrats, Pragmatists Are Still Trumping Progressives Where It Counts

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Sen. Bernie Sanders is seen after the Vermont delegation cast their votes during roll call at the 2016 Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. After the bitter primary between Sanders and Hillary Clinton, the DNC set up a process that has led to reducing the role of party leaders in selecting the presidential nominee. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Republican gubernatorial candidate John Cox speaks to supporters in San Diego on Tuesday. He advanced to the general election against Democrat Gavin Newsom, giving the GOP a foothold in a top statewide race. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Cathy Glasson campaigns one week before the primary election in a Des Moines restaurant. She says she thinks in order to win against Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds, she and her fellow candidates need to run far to the left. Clay Masters/Iowa Public Radio hide caption

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Clay Masters/Iowa Public Radio

Iowa Democrats Want Back Control Of The State, Starting With The Governor

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Georgia Democratic nominee for governor Stacey Abrams takes the stage to declare victory Tuesday night. Abrams is the first black woman to win a major-party nomination for governor in U.S. history. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Stacey Evans (left) and Stacey Abrams (right), the two candidates running for governor in the Georgia Democratic primary on May 22. They have plenty of similarities: they're both women named Stacey; they're both former legislators in the Georgia House of Representatives; they're both lawyers; and they're both calling for similar progressive policies, such as expanding Medicaid. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/NPR

Campaign staff member Aisha Chughtai (left) speaks with Erin Murphy (center), a Democratic candidate for Minnesota governor, at the campaign's St. Paul headquarters as colleague Charles Cox looks on. Chughtai and Cox are members of a newly formed campaign workers union. Brian Bakst/MPR News hide caption

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Brian Bakst/MPR News