Poetry Poetry

April is National Poetry Month, and to celebrate NPR's Morning Edition wants you to share a couplet about teamwork. Justin Pumfrey/Getty Images/Caiaimage hide caption

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Justin Pumfrey/Getty Images/Caiaimage

Write A Poem About Your Team, On Or Off The Court

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Allan Monga, a Deering High School junior, won Poetry Out Loud contests at school and at the state level. He was initially denied entry to the national competition because he's an asylum seeker and not a U.S. citizen. Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images

Asylum-Seeking Student Says Nothing Can Stand Between Him And Poetry

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Asylum-seeker Allan Monga, 19, won Maine's Poetry Out Loud competition in March. But he's been barred from the national competition because he's not a citizen or permanent resident. Courtesy of the Maine Arts Commission hide caption

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Courtesy of the Maine Arts Commission

Maine Asylum-Seeker Fights For His Right To Poetry

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Some of the faces of this never-ending cycle of BREAKING NEWS: (top row, from left) Rod Rosenstein, Stormy Daniels and Scott Pruitt, and (bottom row, from left) John Bolton, Mark Zuckerberg and President Trump. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

Kaveh Akbar — himself a poet — posts in-depth interview with his favorite poets every week on DiveDapper. Larry Davidson/Tallahassee Magazine hide caption

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Larry Davidson/Tallahassee Magazine

Poet Richard Wilbur, shown at his home in Cummington, Mass., in 2006, died on Saturday at the age of 96. Wilbur, a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and translator, intrigued and delighted generations of readers and theatergoers through his rhyming editions of Moliere and his own verse on memory, writing and nature. Nancy Palmieri/AP hide caption

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Nancy Palmieri/AP

Richard Wilbur Reads 'The Opposite Of Pillow'

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Listen to Kristin Laurel read her poem

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Angie Wang for NPR

Listen to Anne Webster read her poem

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