Aging : Shots - Health News Aging

Helping her father die at home "was the most meaningful experience in my nursing career," said Rose Crumb. She went on to found Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County in Port Angeles, Wash. Dan DeLong for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Dan DeLong for Kaiser Health News

Greg unwinds a hose while doing some yardwork. Along with his failing memory, Greg has been experiencing secondary symptoms including paranoia, depression and slow healing. Amanda Kowalski for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Kowalski for NPR

More Than Memory: Coping With The Other Ills Of Alzheimer's

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You're born with roughly 9,000 taste buds, and they're very good at regenerating — which is why you can recover the ability to taste just days after burning your tongue. But that changes as we age. CSA Images/Getty Images hide caption

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CSA Images/Getty Images

Researchers found that a protein in human umbilical cord blood plasma improved learning and memory in older mice, but there's no indication it would work in people. Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images

Human Umbilical Cord Blood Helps Aging Mice Remember, Study Finds

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Emil Girardi, 83, and Shipra Narruhn, 67, chat in Girardi's San Francisco apartment. They were paired through a nonprofit called Little Brothers, Friends of the Elderly, which aims to relieve isolation and loneliness. Anna Gorman/KHN hide caption

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Anna Gorman/KHN

Easing Old People's Loneliness Can Help Keep Them Healthy

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Diseased brain tissue from an Alzheimer's patient showing amyloid plaques (in blue) located in the gray matter of the brain. Dr Cecil H Fox/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr Cecil H Fox/Science Source/Getty Images

Elderly hospitalized patients taken care of by female doctors had better results than those seen by male doctors. Julie Delton/Getty Images hide caption

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Julie Delton/Getty Images

Patients Cared For By Female Doctors Fare Better Than Those Treated By Men

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Bobo gives her mother a kiss. Her mother can't talk or move her arms or legs. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Caring For A Loved One At Home Can Have A Steep Learning Curve

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Luciano Lozano/Getty Images

A Brighter Outlook Could Translate To A Longer Life

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Laura Rees (left) and her sister Nancy Fee sit with their father, Joseph Fee, while holding a photo of his late wife, Elizabeth. Robert Durell for KHN hide caption

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Robert Durell for KHN

Rule Change Could Push Hospitals To Tell Patients About Nursing Home Quality

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More than a quarter of Japan's population is over the age of 65, and its birthrate is falling steadily. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Golden Years, Iron Bars: Japan Sees Rise In Crime By The Elderly

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Education may help brains cope with cognitive decline, and treatments for high blood pressure and other health problems may decrease dementia risk. Alfred Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Alfred Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Dementia Risk Declines, And Education May Be One Reason Why

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Volunteer Julia Torrano helps Estelle Day, 79, style her hair while she's a patient at UCLA Medical Center. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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Ina Jaffe/NPR

Hospital Companions Can Ease Isolation For Older People

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When Morton Pollner was diagnosed with lung cancer at age 76, he thought it was a death sentence. Michael Rubenstein for NPR hide caption

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Michael Rubenstein for NPR

Older Patients Can Benefit From Lung Cancer Surgery

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"It's easier to sort of face the hard things in your life when you're not alone," says hospice chaplain Kerry Egan. "That's a big part of what a chaplain does, is she stays with you." Ann Summa/Getty Images hide caption

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Ann Summa/Getty Images

Hospice Chaplain Reflects On Life, Death And The 'Strength Of The Human Soul'

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Vivian Guzofsky, 88, holds a baby doll at Sunrise Senior Living in Beverly Hills, Calif. Guzofsky, who has Alzheimer's disease, is calm when taking care of the dolls. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Doll Therapy May Help Calm People With Dementia, But It Has Critics

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Brain Game Claims Fail A Big Scientific Test

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