Aging : Shots - Health News Aging

Loneliness is on the rise in the U.S., particularly among younger people, such as members of Generation Z, born between the mid-1990s and the early 2000s, and millennials, just a little bit older. Tara Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Tara Moore/Getty Images

Cutting back up to 25 percent of your calories per day helps slow your metabolism and reduce free radicals that cause cell damage and aging. But would you want to? VisualField/Getty Images hide caption

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VisualField/Getty Images

You May Live Longer By Severely Restricting Calories, Scientists Say

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Ranking member Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., arrives for a Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in December. Critics have raised questions about her age as she runs for re-election. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Will Age Become An Issue In Dianne Feinstein's Re-Election Campaign?

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Dr. James Mold, a family physician and author of Achieving Your Personal Health Goals, says doctors should work with their patients to set mutually agreed-upon goals throughout life. Sarinyapinngam/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Sarinyapinngam/Getty Images/iStockphoto

People are seen walking past the "You Are Beautiful" sign, an art installation by Matthew Hoffman, in the Englewood neighborhood on Chicago's South Side. Nearly half of the people in this African-American neighborhood live below the poverty line, and many seniors have no idea there are public services that might help them. Kristen Norman/NPR hide caption

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Kristen Norman/NPR

Sometimes It Takes A 'Village' To Help Seniors Stay In Their Homes

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Nora Harris, who died in October after a battle with Alzheimer's disease, signed an advance directive stipulating no care to prolong her life. Her husband took the state of Oregon to court because she was spoon-fed against her wishes. Jim Craven for KHN hide caption

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Jim Craven for KHN

Helping her father die at home "was the most meaningful experience in my nursing career," said Rose Crumb. She went on to found Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County in Port Angeles, Wash. Dan DeLong for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Dan DeLong for Kaiser Health News

Greg unwinds a hose while doing some yardwork. Along with his failing memory, Greg has been experiencing secondary symptoms including paranoia, depression and slow healing. Amanda Kowalski for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Kowalski for NPR

More Than Memory: Coping With The Other Ills Of Alzheimer's

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You're born with roughly 9,000 taste buds, and they're very good at regenerating — which is why you can recover the ability to taste just days after burning your tongue. But that changes as we age. CSA Images/Getty Images hide caption

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CSA Images/Getty Images

Researchers found that a protein in human umbilical cord blood plasma improved learning and memory in older mice, but there's no indication it would work in people. Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images

Human Umbilical Cord Blood Helps Aging Mice Remember, Study Finds

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Emil Girardi, 83, and Shipra Narruhn, 67, chat in Girardi's San Francisco apartment. They were paired through a nonprofit called Little Brothers, Friends of the Elderly, which aims to relieve isolation and loneliness. Anna Gorman/KHN hide caption

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Anna Gorman/KHN

Easing Old People's Loneliness Can Help Keep Them Healthy

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Diseased brain tissue from an Alzheimer's patient showing amyloid plaques (in blue) located in the gray matter of the brain. Dr Cecil H Fox/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr Cecil H Fox/Science Source/Getty Images

Elderly hospitalized patients taken care of by female doctors had better results than those seen by male doctors. Julie Delton/Getty Images hide caption

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Julie Delton/Getty Images

Patients Cared For By Female Doctors Fare Better Than Those Treated By Men

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Bobo gives her mother a kiss. Her mother can't talk or move her arms or legs. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Caring For A Loved One At Home Can Have A Steep Learning Curve

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A Brighter Outlook Could Translate To A Longer Life

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