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Psychologist Dr. Julie Rickard at American Behavioral Health Systems (ABHS) Parkside in Wenatchee, Wash., on Tuesday, July 23, 2019. Dr. Rickard, the Program Director at ABHS Parkside, founded a regional suicide prevention coalition in 2012 and is launching one of the nation's few pilot projects to train staff and engage fellow residents to address suicides in long-term care. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Isolated And Struggling, Many Seniors Are Turning To Suicide

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Simple Ways To Prevent Falls In Older Adults

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Accumulated Mutations Create A Cellular Mosaic In Our Bodies

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Flo Filion Meiler, 84, during pole vault training last month. She mostly works out alone, but has a coach to help refine her technique in events like shot put and high jump. Lisa Rathke/AP hide caption

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Lisa Rathke/AP

Such Great Heights: 84-Year-Old Pole Vaulter Keeps Raising The Bar

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A screening test for signs of Alzheimer's disease takes only a few minutes, but many doctors don't perform one during older people's annual wellness visits. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Alzheimer's Screenings Often Left Out Of Seniors' Wellness Exams

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Person undergoing a CAT scan in hospital with PET scan equipment. Emerging studies report findings of brain deterioration in females to be slower than that of males'. Johnny Greig/Getty Images hide caption

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Johnny Greig/Getty Images

Scans Show Female Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down

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Skeletal muscle cells from a rabbit were stained with fluorescent markers to highlight cell nuclei (blue) and proteins in the cytoskeleton (red and green). Daniel Schroen, Cell Applications Inc./Science Source hide caption

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Daniel Schroen, Cell Applications Inc./Science Source

Even something as simple as chopping up food on a regular basis can be enough exercise to help protect older people from showing signs of dementia, a new study suggests. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Daily Movement — Even Household Chores — May Boost Brain Health In Elderly

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A colorized image of a brain cell from an Alzheimer's patient shows a neurofibrillary tangle (red) inside the cytoplasm (yellow) of the cell. The tangles consist primarily of a protein called tau. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Alzheimer's Disease May Develop Differently In African-Americans, Study Suggests

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The shortage is a nationwide problem. And the cause, according to the drug's manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline, is simple: "Unprecedented demand." Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images

The people who got caught up in the exercise boom of the 1970s and stuck with it into their senior years now have significantly healthier hearts and muscles than their sedentary counterparts. David Trood/Getty Images hide caption

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David Trood/Getty Images

Exercise Wins: Fit Seniors Can Have Hearts That Look 30 Years Younger

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A business decision by UnitedHealthcare, the nation's largest health insurance carrier, to drop a popular fitness benefit has upset many people covered by the company's Medicare plans. Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images

When you get hearing aids, it can help you stay more stimulated and socially engaged. Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images

Want To Keep Your Brain Sharp? Take Care Of Your Eyes And Ears

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Osteoporosis specialists are considering wider use of a drug to strengthen bones in elderly women. BSIP/BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Wider Use Of Osteoporosis Drug Could Prevent Bone Fractures In More Elderly Women

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Daily low-dose aspirin can be of help to older people with an elevated risk for a heart attack. But for healthy older people, the risk outweighs the benefit. Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images

Study: A Daily Baby Aspirin Has No Benefit For Healthy Older People

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