Child abuse Child abuse

Jonathan Allen and his wife, Ina Rogers, allegedly kept their 10 children in a squalid California home. Police charged Allen with torture and Rogers with neglect. Solano County Sheriff's Office via/AP hide caption

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Solano County Sheriff's Office via/AP

Toys left by neighbors for the Turpin's children sit on the front of the home of David and Louise Turpin in Perris, Calif., on Jan. 24, 2018. The Turpins are accused of abusing their 13 children, ranging from 2 to 29, before they were rescued on Jan. 14 from their home in Perris. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

California Lawmakers Consider How To Regulate Home Schools After Abuse Discovery

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Louise and David Turpin have each been charged with torture and other crimes after their children were discovered emaciated and shackled to furniture. Riverside County Sheriff's Department via AP hide caption

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Riverside County Sheriff's Department via AP

The inmates in Bellevue are awaiting trial for a variety of offenses, ranging from sleeping on the subway to murder. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Psychiatrist Recalls 'Heartbreak And Hope' On Bellevue's Prison Ward

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Former Penn State University assistant football coach Mike McQueary leaves the Centre County Courthouse Annex in Bellefonte, Pa., last week. He was awarded $7.3 million in damages for defamation. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Women may have different ways of coping with childhood stresses than men, which may increase their risk of health problems in adulthood. Jutta Klee/Uppercut/Getty Images hide caption

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Jutta Klee/Uppercut/Getty Images

Queen Silvia of Sweden attends the World Childhood Foundation 16th anniversary gala Thursday in New York City. Theo Wargo/Getty Images for World Childhood hide caption

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images for World Childhood

The Penn State University campus in State College, Pa. A new state law requires university professors to get a background check every three years and have their fingerprints taken. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

After Sandusky, A Debate Over Whether Sex-Abuse Law Goes Too Far

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Alachua County Sheriff Sadie Darnell (left) and Dr. Nancy Hardt, University of Florida. Bryan Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Bryan Thomas for NPR

A Sheriff And A Doctor Team Up To Map Childhood Trauma

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Silvester Fullard fixes dinner for his 11-year-old son Tavestsiar. When Tavestsiar first came to live with his dad in 2010, he was closed off, Silvester says; "he didn't want to be around other kids." Charles Mostoller for NPR hide caption

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Charles Mostoller for NPR

To Head Off Trauma's Legacy, Start Young

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Vidhya Nagarajan for NPR

10 Questions Some Doctors Are Afraid To Ask

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Can Family Secrets Make You Sick?

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