Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia

Flames are seen at the production facility of Saudi Aramco's Shaybah oilfield in May. Ahmed Jadallah/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Ahmed Jadallah/Reuters

Saudi Arabia's Ambitious Economic Overhaul Hinges On Reducing Its Oil 'Addiction'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/616763148/621127218" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Yemeni fighters loyal to the government carry explosives and land mines believed to have been planted by Houthis on June 8 near Hudaydah. Nabil Hassan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nabil Hassan/AFP/Getty Images

Saudi women wait for their drivers outside a hotel in the Saudi capital Riyadh. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

Hooking Up Gets Easier To Do In Saudi Arabia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/615843528/616733880" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vogue Arabia's June cover stirred controversy by featuring Princess Hayfa bint Abdullah Al Saud in a car, while activists who fought to lift the ban on female drivers in Saudi Arabia remain in custody. Boo George for Vogue Arabia/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Boo George for Vogue Arabia/Screenshot by NPR

Jewelry shops in Riyadh could be among the businesses to feel the strain after a government edict to replace foreign workers with Saudi ones. Fayez Nureldine /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fayez Nureldine /AFP/Getty Images

Saudi Arabian Businesses Struggle With Rule To Replace Foreign Workers With Locals

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612240877/614935627" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saudi women check out cars at an automotive exhibition for women in the Saudi capital Riyadh on May 13. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

Arrests Of Saudi Women's Rights Activists 'Point To The Limits Of Change'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/613040254/613960570" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saudi activist Aziza al-Yousef was arrested this week, along with other women's activists. In this March 29, 2014 photo, she drives a car on a highway in Riyadh as part of a campaign to defy Saudi Arabia's ban on women driving. Hasan Jamali/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Hasan Jamali/AP

Saudi women jog in the streets of Jeddah in March. The government is encouraging greater participation by women in sports. Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images

'Culture Shock Within Their Own Country': Saudis Come To Grips With Swift Changes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/607193358/607414514" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Lubna Olayan in her office at Olayan Financing Company in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in April. Fatma Tanis/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Fatma Tanis/NPR

Lubna Olayan Broke Saudi Arabia's Glass Ceiling. Now She Wants More Women To Work

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/606592459/607395925" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Saudi Arabia's King Salman and Russian President Vladimir Putin pose for a photo during a welcoming ceremony at the Kremlin in October 2017. Last year, Saudi Arabia and Russia were the world's second- and third-largest oil producers, respectively. Alexei Nikolsky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alexei Nikolsky/AP

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif attends a meeting on peacebuilding at the United Nations in New York, on Tuesday. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Iran's Foreign Minister Comes To America, Keeping One Eye On Saudi Arabia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/605243026/605425443" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The AMC cinema in Riyadh hosted the first film screening in more than three decades on April 18. Movie theaters open to the wider public next month after Saudi Arabia lifted a 35-year ban on cinemas as part of a far-reaching liberalization drive. Bandar Al-Jaloud/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bandar Al-Jaloud/AFP/Getty Images

As Saudi Arabia's Cinema Ban Ends, Filmmakers Eye New Opportunities

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/604269002/604372073" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Jean Paul Gaultier was one of the big designers to participate in Saudi Arabia's first Arab Fashion Week in Riyadh. Kristy Sparow/Arab Fashion Council hide caption

toggle caption
Kristy Sparow/Arab Fashion Council

Saudi Arabia's First Arab Fashion Week Kicks Off, Beyond Fashionably Late

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/601972541/602241625" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

CIA Director Mike Pompeo testifies on worldwide threats during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill on Feb. 13, 2018. Pompeo, President Trump's pick to lead the State Department, has portrayed the fight against terrorism as an epic holy war. Saul Loeb /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb /AFP/Getty Images

Trump's National Security And State Department Picks Alarm American Muslims

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/599856473/600761825" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman conducts a meeting with Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May with other members of their delegations, in London, on March 7. Dan Kitwood/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Kitwood/AP

Saudi Arabia: The White House Loves It. Most Americans? Not So Much

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/595018861/595018862" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Saudi Prince Will Court Trump In Visit — And Tech Execs And Hollywood, Too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/594786411/594786412" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript