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Saudi Hay Farm In Arizona Tests State's Supply Of Groundwater

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Mohamed Hashem, one of Saudi Arabia's best known musicians, plays the oud, a Middle Eastern lute. Leila Fadel/NPR hide caption

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Leila Fadel/NPR

An Art Scene Flourishes Behind Closed Doors In Saudi Arabia

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President Obama meets Saudi King Salman bin Abdul Aziz in Riyadh in January. The president is hosting King Salman at the White House Friday. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Obama To Reassure Saudi King Amid Concerns Over Iran Nuclear Deal

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A Saudi company produced the first successful Arabic-language online video game, Unearthed: Trail of Ibn Battuta. It's an adventure tale based on the life of a 14th century Arab explorer. Semaphore hide caption

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Semaphore

As Saudi Arabia's Love Of Online Gaming Grows, Developers Bloom

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President Obama hosts leaders of the Gulf Cooperation Council at Camp David, Md., on May 14. The president gave assurances that the U.S. would support its allies in the region concerned over Iran's growing influence. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Iran Nuclear Pact Could Spark Buildup Of Conventional Weapons

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Saudi actor Nasser al-Qasabi, at left, appears in a scene from his TV show Selfie, which satirizes ISIS. He's received death threats in reaction to the series, which airs on a Saudi-owned channel. Via MBC hide caption

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Via MBC

In Saudi Arabia, An Uphill Fight To Out-Shout The Extremists

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An undated file picture shows Osama bin Laden. A new Wikileaks release purports to reveal that one of his sons requested a death certificate for the al-Qaida leader, who was killed in a U.S. military raid in 2011. EPA/Landov hide caption

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EPA/Landov

Houthi supporters in Yemen's capital hold up at a defaced poster of the ousted president, Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi, during a demonstration against air strikes by Saudi Arabia. The Saudis, who have been bombing Yemen since March, are hosting Hadi and other officials from the former government. Khaled Abdullah/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Khaled Abdullah/Reuters /Landov