Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia

A Saudi woman celebrates with her friends as she drives her car in al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, on Sunday. The lifting of the ban on women driving marks a milestone for women in the kingdom who have had to rely on drivers, male relatives, taxis and ride-hailing services to get to work, go shopping and simply move around. Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters hide caption

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Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters

A column of Yemeni pro-government forces, travels Wednesday about five miles south of Hodeidah international airport. Backed by the Saudi-led coalition, the fighters launched an offensive to retake the rebel-held Red Sea port city. Nabil Hassan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nabil Hassan/AFP/Getty Images

Flames are seen at the production facility of Saudi Aramco's Shaybah oilfield in May. Ahmed Jadallah/Reuters hide caption

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Ahmed Jadallah/Reuters

Saudi Arabia's Ambitious Economic Overhaul Hinges On Reducing Its Oil 'Addiction'

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Yemeni fighters loyal to the government carry explosives and land mines believed to have been planted by Houthis on June 8 near Hudaydah. Nabil Hassan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nabil Hassan/AFP/Getty Images

Saudi women wait for their drivers outside a hotel in the Saudi capital Riyadh. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

Hooking Up Gets Easier To Do In Saudi Arabia

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Vogue Arabia's June cover stirred controversy by featuring Princess Hayfa bint Abdullah Al Saud in a car, while activists who fought to lift the ban on female drivers in Saudi Arabia remain in custody. Boo George for Vogue Arabia/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Boo George for Vogue Arabia/Screenshot by NPR

Jewelry shops in Riyadh could be among the businesses to feel the strain after a government edict to replace foreign workers with Saudi ones. Fayez Nureldine /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fayez Nureldine /AFP/Getty Images

Saudi Arabian Businesses Struggle With Rule To Replace Foreign Workers With Locals

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Saudi women check out cars at an automotive exhibition for women in the Saudi capital Riyadh on May 13. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

Arrests Of Saudi Women's Rights Activists 'Point To The Limits Of Change'

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Saudi activist Aziza al-Yousef was arrested this week, along with other women's activists. In this March 29, 2014 photo, she drives a car on a highway in Riyadh as part of a campaign to defy Saudi Arabia's ban on women driving. Hasan Jamali/AP hide caption

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Hasan Jamali/AP

Saudi women jog in the streets of Jeddah in March. The government is encouraging greater participation by women in sports. Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Amer Hilabi/AFP/Getty Images

'Culture Shock Within Their Own Country': Saudis Come To Grips With Swift Changes

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Lubna Olayan in her office at Olayan Financing Company in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in April. Fatma Tanis/NPR hide caption

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Fatma Tanis/NPR

Lubna Olayan Broke Saudi Arabia's Glass Ceiling. Now She Wants More Women To Work

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