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On the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman tells PBS in a documentary airing next week, "I get all the responsibility because it happened under my watch." Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani called for Saudi Arabia to reject U.S. intervention during his speech at the U.N. General Assembly in New York City on Wednesday. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Saudi Arabia's military displays what it says is wreckage from drones and cruise missiles used to attack Saudi Aramco oil facilities. A Saudi spokesman says the weapons did not come from Yemen, as a rebel group has claimed, but from Iran. Vivian Nereim/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Vivian Nereim/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Smoke was seen billowing from an Aramco facility in Abqaiq, Saudi Arabia, after it came under attack on Saturday. Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters hide caption

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Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters

U.S. Satellites Detected Iran Readying Weapons Ahead Of Saudi Strike, Officials Say

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This image provided on Sunday by the U.S. government and DigitalGlobe and annotated by the source, shows a prestrike overview at Saudi Aramco's Khurais oil field in Buqayq, Saudi Arabia. U.S. government/Digital Globe via AP hide caption

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U.S. government/Digital Globe via AP

The newly appointed Saudi energy minister, Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman (left), meets with his father King Salman, in a handout picture provided by the Saudi Press Agency on Monday. Saudi Press Agency via AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saudi Press Agency via AFP/Getty Images

What Saudi Arabia's Energy Shake-Up Says About Its Oil Plans

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A federal judge says the government must prioritize the release of documents requested under the Freedom of Information Act about the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, seen above in 2014. The U.S. resident was slain in the Saudi Consulate in Turkey last year. Hasan Jamali/AP hide caption

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Hasan Jamali/AP

Dalia Yashar, one of the first Saudi students who registered to become a commercial pilot, stands in front of the registration center at King Fahd International Airport in Dammam, Saudi Arabia, last July. Recent decrees have expanded women's rights. Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters hide caption

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Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters

President Trump, shown here during a 2018 meeting with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman where they discussed arms deals, has blocked an effort to stem the sale of weapons to the Gulf country. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

A light armored vehicle is part of a new monument at the Royal Canadian Regiment Museum in London, Ontario. General Dynamics Land Systems-Canada is producing hundreds of LAVs for sale to Saudi Arabia. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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Jackie Northam/NPR

For Saudi Military Vehicle Deal, Canada Weighs Jobs And Human Rights

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