Muslims Muslims

Asma Khan of Chicago at the booth for her business, Soap Ethics. Monique Parsons for NPR hide caption

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Monique Parsons for NPR

Startups Cater To Muslim Millennials With Dating Apps And Vegan Halal Soap

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In this photo taken in 2011, worshippers are pictured inside the Al-Iman Mosque after midday prayers in the Queens borough of New York. The NYPD disbanded the special unit tasked with carrying out surveillance of Muslim groups in 2014 Charles Dharapak/Associated Press hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/Associated Press

Residents stand at the entrance of Aung Mingalar, a Rohingya quarter of Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar. All but 4,000 of the neighborhood's 15,000 mostly Rohingya residents either fled or were forced to move to internment camps after violence between Buddhists and Muslims in 2012 killed about 200 people. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Barricaded In, Myanmar's Rohingya Struggle To Survive In Ghettos And Camps

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A woman weeps as she visits the grave of a family member killed in the 1995 massacre at the Potocari memorial complex near Srebrenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, on Saturday. Marko Drobnjakovic/AP hide caption

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Marko Drobnjakovic/AP

A still from Haret al Yahood. Haret al Yahood hide caption

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Haret al Yahood

A Muslim-Jewish Love Story On Egyptian TV Sends Sparks Flying

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Newly arrived Rohingya migrants gather at Kuala Langsa Port in Langsa, Aceh province, Indonesia, on Friday after coming ashore. Most such migrants have been prevented from making port in Southeast Asia. Binsar Bakkara/AP hide caption

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Binsar Bakkara/AP

Rabbi Michel Serfaty and his French Jewish Muslim Friendship Association works with many young people in poor neighborhoods. Pierre Andrieu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pierre Andrieu/AFP/Getty Images

For A French Rabbi And His Muslim Team, There's Work To Be Done

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Berlin residents Mareike Geiling (left) and her boyfriend, Jonas Kakoschke, speak with their roommate, a Muslim refugee from Mali. Geiling and Kokoschke helped launch a website that matches Germans willing to share their homes with new arrivals. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR

Germans Open Their Homes To Refugee Roommates

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Ismael Medjdoub grew up in one of Paris' banlieues. He spends up to two hours a day commuting from his home in Tremblay en France to work and to school at the prestigious Sorbonne in Paris. Bilal Qureshi/NPR hide caption

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Bilal Qureshi/NPR

In France, Young Muslims Often Straddle Two Worlds

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Earlier this month, Dr. Sadiqu al-Mousllie, accompanied by his family and a few members of their mosque, stood in downtown Braunschweig, Germany, and held up signs that read: "I am a Moslem. What would you like to know?" in an effort to promote dialogue between Muslims and non-Muslims. Courtesy of Sarah Mousllie hide caption

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Courtesy of Sarah Mousllie

A German Muslim Asks His Compatriots: 'What Do You Want To Know?'

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Duke University's Muslims students will issue their call to prayer today outside the Duke Chapel in Durham, N.C. On Thursday, the university reversed course on allowing the traditional adhan from the chapel's bell tower. Jonathan Drew/AP hide caption

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Jonathan Drew/AP