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Dr. Hillary Tamar, who's in the second year of her family medicine residency in Phoenix, is part of a new generation of doctors who are committed to treating addiction. Jackie Hai/KJZZ hide caption

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Jackie Hai/KJZZ

Aspiring Doctors Seek Advanced Training In Addiction Medicine

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The reality of electronic medical records has yet to live up to the promise. suedhang/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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suedhang/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Why The Promise Of Electronic Health Records Has Gone Unfulfilled

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The common practice of double-booking a lead surgeon's time and letting junior physicians supervise and complete some parts of a surgery is safe for most patients, a study of more than 60,000 operations finds. But there may be a small added risk for a subset of patients. Ian Lishman/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian Lishman/Getty Images

Health staff prepare a cholera treatment tent in September 2018. The country's health system lacks the capacity to contain diseases like cholera. Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images

"There does seem to be across-the-board understanding that what's happening to patients right now isn't right or fair," Sen. Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., said about surprise medical bills. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

When a former patient died from a lethal combination of methadone and Benadryl, Dr. Ako Jacintho got a letter from the state medical board. Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

California Doctors Alarmed As State Links Their Opioid Prescriptions to Deaths

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A moment from Embodied Labs' virtual reality video of Clay Crowder, a fictional 66-year-old man with incurable lung cancer. In this scene, Clay's family gathers around his bed, reassuring him that it's OK to let go of life. Embodied Labs hide caption

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Embodied Labs

Sarah Witter had two operations to repair bones in her lower left leg after a skiing accident last February. The second surgery was needed to replace a stabilizing plate that broke. Matt Baldelli for KHN hide caption

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Matt Baldelli for KHN

Patients and advocates have become an important part of the annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images

Isela was denied life insurance because her medication list showed a prescription for the opioid-reversal drug naloxone. The Boston Medical Center nurse says she wants to have the drug on hand so she can save others. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Nurse Denied Life Insurance Because She Carries Naloxone

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Sakran, a Johns Hopkins trauma surgeon, created the Twitter account @ThisIsOurLane and encouraged other doctors to share their experiences treating victims of gun violence. Courtesy of Joseph Sakran hide caption

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Courtesy of Joseph Sakran

A Trauma Surgeon Who Survived Gun Violence Is Taking On The NRA

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Doctors have been tweeting about their experiences treating victims of gun violence after the NRA mocked a position paper by the American College of Physicians. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

After NRA Mocks Doctors, Physicians Reply: 'This Is Our Lane'

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As more doctors' offices give patients electronic access to their medical records, both patients and their physicians are asking: Exactly how much of your medical record should you get to see? Runstudio/Getty Images hide caption

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Nationally gathered statistics suggest that nearly half of graduating physicians in 2017 owed more than $200,000 in student debt. Cargo/Getty Images hide caption

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Cargo/Getty Images

Michael Vigil, an oil contractor from Douglas, Wyo., traveled 250 miles to Denver to have his aortic valve replaced in May. He said he would have preferred his local hospital do the procedure. Courtesy of Michael Vigil hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael Vigil

Medicare's proposed changes to doctors' compensation will reduce paperwork, physicians agree. But at what cost to their income? andresr/Getty Images hide caption

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andresr/Getty Images

Some Doctors, Patients Balk At Medicare's 'Flat Fee' Payment Proposal

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Training on how to spot human trafficking is given not only to doctors and nurses but also to registration and reception staff, social workers and security guards. A-Digit/Getty Images hide caption

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A-Digit/Getty Images
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