Doctors : Shots - Health News Doctors

Medicare's proposed changes to doctors' compensation will reduce paperwork, physicians agree. But at what cost to their income? andresr/Getty Images hide caption

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Some Doctors, Patients Balk At Medicare's 'Flat Fee' Payment Proposal

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Training on how to spot human trafficking is given not only to doctors and nurses but also to registration and reception staff, social workers and security guards. A-Digit/Getty Images hide caption

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A-Digit/Getty Images

Describing how pain affects your daily activities may be more effective than the standard pain scale. Lynn Scurfield for NPR hide caption

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Lynn Scurfield for NPR

Words Matter When Talking About Pain With Your Doctor

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Unlike the three-year residency programs that doctors must generally complete after medical school in order to practice medicine, nurse practitioner residency programs, sometimes called fellowships, are completely voluntary. Antenna/fStop/Getty Images hide caption

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Border Patrol agents take a father and son from Honduras into custody near the U.S.-Mexico border. The asylum seekers were then sent to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing center for possible separation. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

A Pediatrician Reports Back From A Visit To A Children's Shelter Near The Border

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If you're at low risk for heart disease, an electrocardiogram shouldn't be a routine test for you, a panel of medical experts says. Bruno Boissonnet/Science Source hide caption

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Bruno Boissonnet/Science Source

The drug test developed by Aegis Sciences checks urine samples to help doctors determine if their patients are taking their blood pressure medicine. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Drug Test Spurs Frank Talk Between Hypertension Patients And Doctors

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Dr. Katie Merriam, an OB-GYN resident in Charlotte, N.C., says she loves her mostly female work environment but also appreciates having male colleagues. Alex Olgin/WFAE hide caption

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Alex Olgin/WFAE

Male OB-GYNs Are Rare, But Is That A Problem?

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Feranmi Okanlami, now a doctor, became partially paralyzed after an accident in 2013. He says adjustments for his disability during his training, like this chair that lets him stand, helped him succeed. A new report finds variability in medical institution culture and protocols when it comes to supporting aspiring doctors with disabilities. Courtesy of Feranmi Okanlami hide caption

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Courtesy of Feranmi Okanlami

Renea Molden was able to stop taking opioid painkillers with the help of non-opioid alternatives. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Opioids Don't Beat Other Medications For Chronic Pain

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Sure, this elixir is tasty and comforting, but will it actually soothe your sore throat and help bring your voice back? Ovidiu Minzat/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Ovidiu Minzat/EyeEm/Getty Images

Rosemary Grant is a registered nurse and helps coordinate sepsis care at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. The center's goal, she says, is to get a patient who might be developing sepsis antibiotics within three hours. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

Synergy Between Nurses And Automation Could Be Key To Finding Sepsis Early

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Ariel Haughton's children Rose (left), 4, and Javier, 2, are covered by CHIP. Haughton is upset that lawmakers have left CHIP in flux for her two children and millions of kids around the country. Courtesy of Ariel Haughton hide caption

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Courtesy of Ariel Haughton

A doctor's nearly fatal medical event opened her eyes to communication lapses, uncoordinated care and at times a total lack of empathy in the health care system. kokouu/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Dr. James Mold, a family physician and author of Achieving Your Personal Health Goals, says doctors should work with their patients to set mutually agreed-upon goals throughout life. Sarinyapinngam/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Sarinyapinngam/Getty Images/iStockphoto