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Matt Larson, shortly after his brain surgery, with his wife, Kelly. Larson says he would like the option to end his life rather than face a painful death. Courtesy of Matt Larson hide caption

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Courtesy of Matt Larson

A Syrian medical worker inspects the damage at the site of a medical facility after it was reportedly hit by Syrian regime barrel bombs on Oct. 1 in Aleppo's rebel-held neighborhood of al-Sakhour. Fewer than 30 doctors remain in the besieged city. Thaer Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Thaer Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images

Eastern Aleppo's Only Ophthalmologist Sees Ravages Of Syria's War

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Dr. Lars Aanning, seen at his home outside Yankton, S.D., said he lied to protect a colleague in a malpractice case. Now, Aanning is a patient safety advocate. Jay Pickthorn/AP for ProPublica hide caption

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Jay Pickthorn/AP for ProPublica

Health care providers have to have permission from the federal government to provide medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Cassie Ray (seen with her husband, Gerry) got a surprise bill from an out-of-network anesthesiologist after an operation. Courtesy of Cassie Ray hide caption

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Courtesy of Cassie Ray

California Aims To Limit Surprise Medical Bills

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California State Sen. Ed Hernandez wrote a law to keep insurance directories up to date and to give consumers recourse when errors lead to surprise bills. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Jacquelyn Clark, co-owner of Bristlecone Shooting, Training and Retail Center in Lakewood, Colo., holds a list of gun safety rules. One recommendation: Consider "off-site storage if a family member may be suicidal." John Daley/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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John Daley/Colorado Public Radio

Colorado Gun Shops Work Together To Prevent Suicides

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A project now under construction in Cleveland will eventually house the Case Western Reserve University's medical, dental and nursing schools, as well as the Cleveland Clinic's in-house medical school. Courtesy of Cleveland Clinic hide caption

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Courtesy of Cleveland Clinic

Teaching Medical Teamwork Right From The Start

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Express Scripts assures patients it has a policy of not putting cancer medicine or mental health drugs on the list of products it excludes from its formulary. Fuse/Getty Images hide caption

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Fuse/Getty Images

Will Your Prescription Meds Be Covered Next Year? Better Check!

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A poll of psychiatrists about the mental fitness of Barry Goldwater, Republican nominee for president in 1964, led to the creation of a rule that discourages doctors from public diagnoses. William Lovelace/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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William Lovelace/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Nurse specialist Annelie Nilsson checks on patient Janet Prochazka during her stay at the Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, after Prochazka took a bad fall in March. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Hospital Units Tailored To Older Patients Can Help Prevent Decline

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Kathy Snook, Terri Anderson and Gary Snook traveled from Montana to Dr. Forest Tennant's office in West Covina, Calif. Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio

Montana's 'Pain Refugees' Leave State To Get Prescribed Opioids

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Katherine Streeter for KQED

Frustrated You Can't Find A Therapist? They're Frustrated, Too

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