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Kate Teague, a registered nurse at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, in Palo Alto, Calif., holds a premature baby's hand. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

In Caring For Sickest Babies, Doctors Now Tap Parents For Tough Calls

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(Left to right) NYU medical students Brian Chao, Michael Lui, Hye Min Choi, and Varun Vijay take the team approach to learning about the anatomy of cells, and how disease can disrupt them. Analyzing big data sets is now a routine part of their studies, too. Cindy Carpien for NPR hide caption

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Cindy Carpien for NPR

Medical Students Crunch Big Data To Spot Health Trends

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Dr. Janina Morrison, right, speaks with patient Jorge Colorado and his daughter Margarita Lopez about Colorado's diabetes at the Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Jeffrey Okonye (left) and Oviea Akpotaire are fourth-year medical students at the University of Texas Southwestern. Lauren Silverman/KERA hide caption

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Lauren Silverman/KERA

There Were Fewer Black Men In Medical School In 2014 Than In 1978

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Errors in diagnosis, such as inaccuracies or delays in making the information available, account for an estimated 10 percent of patient deaths, a blue-ribbon report says. iStockphoto hide caption

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A boy sits on his father's shoulders, part of a crowd of migrants waiting to board a train leaving for the Austrian border at the Keleti railway station in Budapest. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Trained In Budapest, Middle Eastern Doctors Return To Aid Migrants

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