Doctors : Shots - Health News Doctors

A doctor walks through a hallway at the Centro Medico trauma center in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 2013. A medical exodus has been taking place for a decade in the Caribbean territory as doctors and nurses flee for the U.S. mainland, seeking higher salaries and better reimbursements from insurers. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AP

SOS: Puerto Rico Is Losing Doctors, Leaving Patients Stranded

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A federal whistleblower suit unsealed in late February alleges that Humana knew about billing fraud involving Medicare Advantage patients and didn't stop it. Ty Wright/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ty Wright/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Some doctors say clinicians can now get much more information from newer technology than they can get from a stethoscope. Clinging to the old tool isn't necessary, they say. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

The Stethoscope: Timeless Tool Or Outdated Relic?

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Criminologist Joseph Richardson is skeptical that the federal government alone can solve the data problem for police shootings. "There has to be a more pioneering, innovative approach to doing it," he says. Spotmatik/iStockphoto hide caption

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Spotmatik/iStockphoto
Dana Neely/Corbis

Study Suggests Surgical Residents Can Safely Work Longer Shifts

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After knee surgery, David Larson, 66, of Huntington Beach, Calif., experienced pain in a calf muscle. His answer to an automated email from the doctor led to the diagnosis and treatment of a potentially dangerous blood clot. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Belle Likover, a 96-year-old retired social worker, told Case Western Reserve medical students that growing old gracefully is all about being able to adapt to one's changing life situation, including health challenges. Lynn Ischay/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Lynn Ischay/Kaiser Health News
Hanna Barczyk for NPR

How Sound Reveals The Invisible Within Us

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Many hospitals haven't fully implemented guidelines put forth in 2010 to minimize errors in the determination of brain death. Caiaimage/Sam Edwards/Getty Images hide caption

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Caiaimage/Sam Edwards/Getty Images

Researchers Find Lapses In Hospitals' Policies For Determining Brain Death

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