Doctors : Shots - Health News Doctors

Pharmacists in California will have to give women a short health consultation before providing contraceptives without a prescription. Media for Medical/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Media for Medical/UIG via Getty Images

Dr. Abraham Nussbaum argues for medicine to reconnect with its past: Caring for patients should be a calling, not a job, he says. PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
PhotoAlto/Michele Constantini/Getty Images

Diane Horvath-Cosper says part of her job is advocating for patients' access to health care, including abortions. Gabriella Demczuk hide caption

toggle caption
Gabriella Demczuk

Can A Hospital Tell A Doctor To Stop Talking About Abortion?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476775501/476844463" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Medical errors rank behind heart disease and cancer as the third leading cause of death in the U.S., Johns Hopkins researchers say. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto

Hear Rachel Martin talk with Dr. Martin Makary

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476636183/476705928" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Talking about end-of-life care may be difficult, but the stakes make the conversations worth the effort. Sam Edwards/Getty Images/Caiaimage hide caption

toggle caption
Sam Edwards/Getty Images/Caiaimage

The entrance to Sutter Davis Hospital in Davis, Calif. Sutter Health has hospitals in more than 100 communities in Northern California; it reported $11 billion in revenue last year, with an operating profit of $287 million. Ken James/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ken James/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A doctor walks through a hallway at the Centro Medico trauma center in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in 2013. A medical exodus has been taking place for a decade in the Caribbean territory as doctors and nurses flee for the U.S. mainland, seeking higher salaries and better reimbursements from insurers. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ricardo Arduengo/AP

SOS: Puerto Rico Is Losing Doctors, Leaving Patients Stranded

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/469974138/470194293" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A federal whistleblower suit unsealed in late February alleges that Humana knew about billing fraud involving Medicare Advantage patients and didn't stop it. Ty Wright/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ty Wright/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Some doctors say clinicians can now get much more information from newer technology than they can get from a stethoscope. Clinging to the old tool isn't necessary, they say. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

toggle caption
Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

The Stethoscope: Timeless Tool Or Outdated Relic?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467212821/468298007" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript