Doctors : Shots - Health News Doctors

Calls for tort reform in regards to medical malpractice are popular on the campaign trail. But research shows that costs from medical liability make up just 2 to 2.5 percent of total health care spending in the U.S. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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FangXiaNuo/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Dr. Vanessa Grubbs and Robert Phillips at their wedding in August 2005. Just a few months earlier, when his kidneys were failing, she gave him one of hers. Courtesy of Vanessa Grubbs hide caption

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Courtesy of Vanessa Grubbs

'Interlaced Fingers' Traces Roots Of Racial Disparity In Kidney Transplants

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In theory, "direct primary care" should result in better health for patients and lower health care costs overall. But some analysts say that approach just encourages the worried well to get more care than they need. BraunS /Getty Images hide caption

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BraunS /Getty Images

A 4-year-old regulation in New York state requires doctors and hospitals to treat sepsis using a protocol that some researchers now question. Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Getty Images/iStockphoto

Are State Rules For Treating Sepsis Really Saving Lives?

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The good old reflex hammer (like this Taylor model) might seem like an outdated medical device, but its role in diagnosing disease is still as important as ever. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

As baby boomers age, more older Americans are visiting the emergency room, which can be an overcrowded, disorienting and even traumatic place. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News
Bill Diodato/Getty Images

How U.S. Health Care Became Big Business

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Mick Wiggins/Ikon Images/Getty Images

How Flawed Science Is Undermining Good Medicine

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Doctors who trained in foreign medical schools often end up practicing in rural or low-income areas in the U.S. with a shortage of physicians. shapecharge/Getty Images hide caption

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shapecharge/Getty Images

Medical graduates from Iran, in Philadelphia on research fellowships, anxiously await results of their U.S. medical residency applications. The Trump administration's immigration executive order has put added stress on "match week" for them. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon/WHYY

Travel Ban Adds Stress To 'Match Week' For Some Doctors

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Advocates of paying a family doctor a flat monthly fee for office visits and some lab work say it saves patients money when coupled with a high-deductible insurance plan. Ridofranz/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Nancy Roach at a conference in 2016. She's long worked as a patient's advocate and recently teamed up with scientists to help improve the design of studies, as well as to improve clinical care. Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer hide caption

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Andrew Wortmann/Courtesy of Fight Colorectal Cancer

Advice From Patients On A Study's Design Makes For Better Science

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