Doctors : Shots - Health News Doctors

Errors in diagnosis, such as inaccuracies or delays in making the information available, account for an estimated 10 percent of patient deaths, a blue-ribbon report says. iStockphoto hide caption

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A boy sits on his father's shoulders, part of a crowd of migrants waiting to board a train leaving for the Austrian border at the Keleti railway station in Budapest. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Trained In Budapest, Middle Eastern Doctors Return To Aid Migrants

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Dr. David Burkons holds the licensing certificates that allowed him to open a clinic that provides medical and surgical abortions. It took about 18 extra months of inspections, he says, to get the approval to offer surgical abortions. Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/WCPN

Bucking Trend, Ohio Doctor Opens Clinic That Provides Abortion Services

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR

Close Listening: How Sound Reveals The Invisible

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Amanda Angelotti (left) and Connie Chen, both graduates of University of California, San Francisco's medical school, opted for careers in digital health. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Josh Cassidy/KQED

Nora Zamichow says if she and her husband, Mark Saylor, had known how doctors die, they might have made different treatment decisions for him toward the end of his life. Maya Sugarman/KPCC hide caption

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Maya Sugarman/KPCC

Knowing How Doctors Die Can Change End-Of-Life Discussions

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