Doctors : Shots - Health News Doctors

Ariel Haughton's children Rose (left), 4, and Javier, 2, are covered by CHIP. Haughton is upset that lawmakers have left CHIP in flux for her two children and millions of kids around the country. Courtesy of Ariel Haughton hide caption

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Courtesy of Ariel Haughton

A doctor's nearly fatal medical event opened her eyes to communication lapses, uncoordinated care and at times a total lack of empathy in the health care system. kokouu/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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kokouu/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Dr. James Mold, a family physician and author of Achieving Your Personal Health Goals, says doctors should work with their patients to set mutually agreed-upon goals throughout life. Sarinyapinngam/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Sarinyapinngam/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent, joined protesters outside the U.S. Capitol in late November, as Republicans in the Senate worked to pass a sweeping tax bill. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

After two weeks of recovery from an addiction to opioids prescribed by her surgeon, Katie Herzog takes a walk with her dog, Pippen. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Should Hospitals Be Punished For Post-Surgical Patients' Opioid Addiction?

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Dr. Jerad Gardner (right) and Dr. Pembe Oltulu, a pathologist from Konya, Turkey. They'd connected over Facebook. She flew to Istanbul for a real-life meeting when Gardner had a layover at the airport on a trip to meet a sarcoma patient he'd learned about on the social media platform. Jerad Gardner hide caption

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Jerad Gardner

Dr. Eduardo Ibarra checks the blood pressure of Carmen Garcia Lavoy in the Toa Baja area of Puerto Rico. He's been making house calls in the area with nurse Erika Rodriguez. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Lingering Power Outage In Puerto Rico Strains Health Care System

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Dr. Ruth Berggren stands outside Charity Hospital in New Orleans in 2005, where she had earlier cared for patients during Hurricane Katrina. Cheryl Gerber/AP hide caption

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Cheryl Gerber/AP

Across the state of Maine, the number of prescriptions for painkillers is dropping. But some patients who have chronic pain say they need high doses of the medication to be able to function. Fanatic Studio/Getty Images hide caption

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Fanatic Studio/Getty Images

Intent On Reversing Its Opioid Epidemic, A State Limits Prescriptions

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While doctors and nurses have an ethical duty to treat all patients, they are not immune to feelings of dread when it comes to patients who are hateful or belligerent. A well-known article from the 1970s spoke to this. Sally Elford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sally Elford/Getty Images

Valeant Pharmaceuticals, based in Bridgewater Township, N.J., bought two specialty heart drugs used in emergency treatment from Marathon Pharmaceuticals in 2015, and then dramatically increased each drug's price. Ron Antonelli/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Antonelli/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Dr. Kurt Newman visits with 14-year-old Jack Pessaud, who's undergoing treatment for a cancerous tumor in his knee at Children's National Health System in Washington, D.C. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

'Healing Children': A Surgeon's Take On What Kids Need

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Calls for tort reform in regards to medical malpractice are popular on the campaign trail. But research shows that costs from medical liability make up just 2 to 2.5 percent of total health care spending in the U.S. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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FangXiaNuo/Getty Images/iStockphoto