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The Rev. Randolph Hollerith, dean of the Washington National Cathedral (from left); the Rt. Rev. Carl Wright, the Episcopal Church's bishop suffragan for the armed forces; and Maj. Gen. Steven Schaick, the Air Force chief of chaplains, participate in the blessing of a Bible for swearing in U.S. Space Force officials. Danielle E. Thomas/Washington National Cathedral hide caption

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Danielle E. Thomas/Washington National Cathedral

Sharon Litton of Shreveport, La., is baptized by immersion in the Jordan River, where Jesus is said to have been baptized. Such baptisms are a staple of evangelical tours of Israel. Courtesy of Randy Litton hide caption

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Courtesy of Randy Litton

As U.S. Jews Cool To Israel, Evangelicals Flock There As Tourists

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A team of archaeologists work at the excavation site in the coastal Israeli city of Ashkelon on June 28. Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Menahem Kahana/AFP/Getty Images

Steve Green in the basement of the Washington Design Center, which was recently demolished as part of the construction for the Museum of the Bible. Green and his family, owners of Hobby Lobby, are building the Museum of the Bible. Andre Chung for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Andre Chung for The Washington Post/Getty Images

D.C. Bible Museum Will Be Immersive Experience, Organizers Say

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A parishioner holds the Holy Bible during a service. A Louisiana bill that would have made the Bible the state's official book has been withdrawn. Kevin Rivoli/The Post-Standard /Landov hide caption

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Kevin Rivoli/The Post-Standard /Landov

Actors on Oslo, Norway, rehearse a scene from Bibelen, a six-hour play based on a nontraditional interpretation of the Bible. Interest in the Bible and biblical stories has surged in secularized Norway. AP hide caption

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AP