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Greg Gatscher, left, and his son, Evan, prepare the house for Hurricane Irma. Little did they know these metal shutters would later become a cooktop. Tara Gatscher hide caption

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Tara Gatscher

The Amana Radarange was born of a happy accident caused by an engineer who was working for the defense contractor Raytheon in the 1940s. Courtesy of The Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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Courtesy of The Smithsonian Institution

3, 2, 1 ... Beeeep! Your Microwave's 50th Anniversary Is Ready

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Today, veggie burgers are engineered to be more like meat than could have been conceived in the basement health-food stores of the 1980s or the sanitariums of a century prior. Deb Lindsey/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Deb Lindsey/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Lillie Pete sifts the juniper ash before adding it to her blue corn mush. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

To Get Calcium, Navajos Burn Juniper Branches To Eat The Ash

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For 13.1 million American kids, the lack of access to school meals during the summer means they're not sure when they might next eat. perepelova/iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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perepelova/iStockphoto/Getty Images

Chef Michael Scelfo of Cambridge, Mass., left, and Lisa Carlson, who operates three food trucks in Minneapolis, collaborate on the Glynwood dinner's spelt salad with lamb tongues and hearts, and "ugly" cherries, shiitakes, and kale. Lela Nargi/NPR hide caption

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Lela Nargi/NPR

Author Michael Ruhlman says U.S. grocery stores represent extraordinary luxury that most Americans don't even think about. Kelly Jo Smart/NPR hide caption

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Kelly Jo Smart/NPR

Grocery Stores: 'The Best Of America And The Worst Of America'

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Daniel Klein picks meat from crabs with the young daughter of a former strawberry picker in Oxnard, Calif., for an episode called "A Day In The Life." Courtesy of Perennial Plate hide caption

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Courtesy of Perennial Plate

Allie Wist's "Flooded" dinner spread includes burdock and dandelion root hummus with sunchoke chips; jellyfish salad; roasted hen of the woods mushroom; fried potatoes with chipotle vegan mayo; salted anchovies; and oysters with slippers. Most of these are foods that might be more resilient to climate change and, therefore, what we could be eating in the future, Wist says. Heami Lee/Courtesy of Allie Wist, food stylist C.C. Buckley, prop stylist Rebecca Bartoshesy hide caption

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Heami Lee/Courtesy of Allie Wist, food stylist C.C. Buckley, prop stylist Rebecca Bartoshesy