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Lt. Gen. Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo is a social media personality. He's also the leader of the paramilitary group that attacked thousands of pro-democracy protesters on June 3, leaving more than a 100 dead. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Why Facebook Won't Kick Off A Warlord

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Why are some warnings heard, while others are ignored? Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

How To See The Future (No Crystal Ball Needed)

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Sudanese demonstrators gather near military headquarters in the capital Khartoum on Monday. Organizers said they were resisting an attempt to disperse the sit-in where thousands of people have camped out for days. Ahmed Mustafa/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmed Mustafa/AFP/Getty Images

Protesters rally near the military headquarters on Tuesday in Khartoum, Sudan. Activists behind the anti-government protests say that security forces killed 14 people on Tuesday as troops moved to break up the demonstration. AP hide caption

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AP

People protest in the Sudanese city of Kordofan on Dec. 23, days after demonstrations first broke out in the country. Protesters have continued to gather for more than two weeks, calling for the ouster of President Omar al-Bashir. Sudanese Activist/AP hide caption

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Sudanese Activist/AP

Rick Harrison (from left) was a firefighter and machinist on the USS Cole, and David Morales was a boatswain's mate. Lorrie Triplett, Jamal Gunn and David Francis all lost family members who worked aboard the Cole. William Conlon/NPR hide caption

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William Conlon/NPR

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan shakes hands with local people in Port Sudan, Sudan, on Dec. 25, one of many locations in Africa the Turkish leader has visited recently. Kayhan Ozer/AP hide caption

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Kayhan Ozer/AP

Turkey Is Quietly Building Its Presence In Africa

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Boats sail on the Nile River in Cairo, Egypt, last October. Tensions between Egypt and upstream Nile basin countries, Sudan and Ethiopia, have flared up again over the construction and effects of a massive dam being built by Ethiopia on the Nile River. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Amr Nabil/AP

African migrants leaving an Israeli government immigration office in Bnei Brak, Israel. Posters in Arabic and Tigrinya on the wall announce Israel's "voluntary departure" policy for Sudanese and Eritrean migrants. Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin/NPR

Israel Gives African Asylum-Seekers A Choice: Deportation Or Jail

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A U.N. peacekeeper stands guard in central Darfur on June 19. The town, a former rebel bastion, was recently captured by Sudanese government forces. The top U.S. diplomat in Sudan, Steven Koutsis, visited Darfur last month to assess security before the Trump administration decides whether to lift sanctions. Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ashraf Shazly/AFP/Getty Images

For Sudan, A Looming Deadline On Possible Lifting Of U.S. Sanctions

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The singer Alsarah: "Sudanese people said I wasn't Sudanese enough. Arabs said I wasn't an Arab. Americans said I wasn't American. I used to be like, 'I don't belong anywhere! Now I'm like you're all mine. All my countries, you're all mine." Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Mustafa Alnour Alhassan, 26, lost his leg to a flesh-eating fungal disease called mycetoma. Here, he sits beside his father, Alnour Alhassan, at the Mycetoma Research Center in Khartoum, the capital of Sudan. Neil Brandvold hide caption

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Neil Brandvold

French Port City Becomes Final Way Station For Some Migrants' Odysseys

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Daniel Majok Gai revisits the two-bedroom apartment in Denver where he lived with seven other Sudanese refugees in 2001. Kevin Leahy/NPR hide caption

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Kevin Leahy/NPR

He Fled Sudan And Made A New Life In The U.S. So Why Go Back?

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A woman and her daughter walk at the Zam Zam camp for internally displaced people in North Darfur, Sudan, in June 2014. The U.S. and other countries have said that Sudan is committing genocide in Darfur, and the United Nations has an ongoing peacekeeping program. But many in the region still live in fear and misery. Albert Gonzalez Farran/AP hide caption

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Albert Gonzalez Farran/AP

The Spotlight On Darfur Is Gone, But Not The Abuses

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Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir (center), seen here next to Congo's president Denis Sasso-Nguesso (right) and Prime Minister of the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic Abdelkader Taleb Oumar, escaped an arrest order in South Africa. Gianluigi Guercia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gianluigi Guercia/AFP/Getty Images

Sudanese President Flies Home After South African Court Orders His Arrest

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