Veterans Veterans

U.S. soldiers stand at a checkpoint around Lakokhel camp in Afghanistan in 2010. Many soldiers return from war suffering from "moral injuries," or dealing with the fact that their sense of right and wrong was violated. Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images

Moral Injury Is The 'Signature Wound' Of Today's Veterans

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Four Americans injured in Iraq and Afghanistan visit Kabul as part of Operation Proper Exit, a program designed for wounded warriors. From left, they are Staff Sgt. Ben Dellinger, Capt. Casey Wolfe, Capt. John Urquhart (who is hidden) and Sgt. James "Eddie" Wright. Sean Carberry/NPR hide caption

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Sean Carberry/NPR

Wounded In Combat, U.S. Troops Go Back For A 'Proper Exit'

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For some rural vets who live far from a VA hospital, getting medical care has meant driving a day or two from home, and missing work. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

A Benefit For Rural Vets: Getting Health Care Close To Home

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Alexander Morales, who served in the Army in the 1970s, with his family: wife Roberta; Elvia, 7, Elena, 8, and Elvira, 7 (in front), and Ruben Verdugo, 13, and Aaron D. Huerta, 17 (in back). Morales' family has been going for years to the Stand Down event in San Diego, where veterans receive assistance. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Homeless Vets: They're Not Just Single Men Anymore

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For veterans like Tim Maynard, scuba diving provides relief from symptoms of PTSD. Maynard goes diving once a week, exploring the Florida Keys and shipwrecks off the coast of North Carolina. Courtesy of Tim Maynard hide caption

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Courtesy of Tim Maynard

Some Veterans Find Peace Thanks To Scuba Gear, Quiet Waters

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Veterans Kick The Prescription Pill Habit, Against Doctors' Orders

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Soldiers returning from the Pacific wave from the deck of the USS General Mitchell on Dec. 11, 1945. Much of the health care demand in the VA system is from veterans of earlier wars. AP hide caption

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AP

Tom Tarantino, chief policy officer at Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill Thursday about holding the Department of Veterans Affairs accountable. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Veterans Advocate Says He Fears Loss Of Faith In VA

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A cross-section of skeletal muscle in this light micrograph shows the individual, parallel muscle fibers (red). These fibers work in concert to power movement. Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR/ScienceSource hide caption

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Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR/ScienceSource

Experimental Technique Coaxes Muscles Destroyed By War To Regrow

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Remembrance poppies honoring veterans cover a shrine in Wellington, New Zealand, on a recent April 25, when Australia and New Zealand mark ANZAC Day. A new campaign urges people to buy a minute of silence to support veterans. Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images hide caption

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Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images

A crowd gathers at the World War II Memorial to call for reopening national memorials closed by the government shutdown. The rally drew support from military veterans, Tea Party activists and Republicans. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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