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Veterans

Brenda J. Faulkner, co-founder of The Truman Foundation, sits with her dog Truman at the Association of Service Dog Providers for Military Veterans annual conference in Tyson's Corner, Va. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR
Sarah Gonzales for NPR

Marines Who Fired Rocket Launchers Now Worry About Their Brains

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Jesse Henderson (left), an Army veteran, walks Hollywood Boulevard in Los Angeles looking for homeless veterans. His job is to try and connect them with support resources, including transitional housing, offered by the nonprofit U.S.Vets. Gloria Hillard/NPR hide caption

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Gloria Hillard/NPR

Fewer Homeless Veterans On LA's Streets

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Veterans Affairs secretary nominee Robert Wilkie (right) speaks with Marion Polk, national commander of AMVETS, before testifying at a Senate Veterans Affairs Committee nominations hearing Wednesday. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Trump's Uncontroversial VA Pick Sails Through Confirmation Hearing

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Air Force veteran Cat Corchado leads support groups in Charlotte, N.C., specifically for female veterans. Her group is called Women Veteran Network, or WoVeN. Jay Price/North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC hide caption

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Jay Price/North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC

Battling Depression And Suicide Among Female Veterans

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(Top) Britnee Kinard's husband, Hamilton, has a brain injury and PTSD. She got kicked off the program by the Charleston VA in 2014. (Left) Hamilton's daily medication. (Right) His uniform in the closet at their home in Richmond Hill, Ga. Eva Verbeeck for NPR hide caption

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Eva Verbeeck for NPR

VA's Caregiver Program Still Dropping Veterans With Disabilities

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U.S. Marines fire the Carl Gustav rocket system during live-fire training last October. With each firing, the shooter's brain is exposed to pulses of high pressure air emanating from the explosion that travel faster than the speed of sound. Sgt. Aaron Patterson/3rd Marine Division/DVIDS hide caption

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Sgt. Aaron Patterson/3rd Marine Division/DVIDS

Report To Army Finds Blast From Some Weapons May Put Shooter's Brain At Risk

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President Trump has always managed by instinct and gut, but the results don't always translate into a successful Cabinet confirmation or policies that can withstand judicial scrutiny. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Veterans in Murfreesboro, Tenn., enjoy a wheelchair tai chi class; other alternative health programs now commonly offered at VA hospitals in the U.S. include yoga, mindfulness training and art therapy. Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio

To Treat Pain, PTSD And Other Ills, Some Vets Try Tai Chi

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Former Vice President Joe Biden, shown at the White House in January 2017, didn't just give a handout to a man in need, but a hand of help. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Joe Biden And A Homeless Veteran Have A Very Human Moment

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Vanessa Flores (right) embraces another woman Friday after she leaves the locked-down Veterans Home of California in Yountville, Calif., during a hostage situation. Law enforcement officers found a gunman and three hostages dead after a lengthy standoff. Stephen Lam/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Lam/Getty Images