Veterans Veterans

Daniel Harmon, a veteran of the wars in both Afghanistan and Iraq, looks out the window of his room at the Hollywood Veterans Center in Los Angeles. The facility provides housing to homeless vets. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

The U.S. Declared War On Veteran Homelessness — And It Actually Could Win

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The USS Indianapolis (CA-35), pictured off the Mare Island Navy Yard, Calif., in July 1945. U.S. Navy/National Archives via Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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U.S. Navy/National Archives via Wikimedia Commons

Cost Of War: Veterans Remember USS Indianapolis, Shark Attacks

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Lydia Thompson/NPR

In Debut Novel, Air Force Officer Questions How We Honor Our Veterans

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Veterans Choice Act Fails To Ease Travel Burdens For Vets In Need Of Care

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A U.S. Air Force C-123 sprays herbicides on dense jungle beside a South Vietnamese highway on May 18, 1966. This aircraft is the last in a formation of three. Spray from the other two planes can be seen ahead. U.S. Air Force via AP hide caption

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U.S. Air Force via AP

Air Force Reservists Say Agent Orange Residue Damaged Their Health

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The ferry pulls in to Friday Harbor, the only incorporated city in San Juan County, Wash. Veterans will often travel the hourlong ferry ride to reach VA services here. Patricia Murphy/KUOW hide caption

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Patricia Murphy/KUOW

In Remote Washington, Veterans Services Are Ferry Ride Away

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Grant County Veterans Service Officer Bob Kelley (right) works with World War II Army veteran Frederick Kern at the Grant County Government Building in Marion, Ind., on Monday. Aaron P. Bernstein for NPR hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein for NPR

Without Help, Navigating Benefits Can Be Overwhelming For Veterans

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As an Army chaplain in Iraq, David Peters administered last rites and grieved with survivors. When he came home, he says, he "fell apart emotionally and spiritually." Courtesy of Robert K. Chambers hide caption

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Courtesy of Robert K. Chambers

An Army Chaplain, First Tested By War, Finds His Faith Renewed

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U.S. soldiers stand at a checkpoint around Lakokhel camp in Afghanistan in 2010. Many soldiers return from war suffering from "moral injuries," or dealing with the fact that their sense of right and wrong was violated. Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images

Moral Injury Is The 'Signature Wound' Of Today's Veterans

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Four Americans injured in Iraq and Afghanistan visit Kabul as part of Operation Proper Exit, a program designed for wounded warriors. From left, they are Staff Sgt. Ben Dellinger, Capt. Casey Wolfe, Capt. John Urquhart (who is hidden) and Sgt. James "Eddie" Wright. Sean Carberry/NPR hide caption

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Sean Carberry/NPR

Wounded In Combat, U.S. Troops Go Back For A 'Proper Exit'

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For some rural vets who live far from a VA hospital, getting medical care has meant driving a day or two from home, and missing work. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

A Benefit For Rural Vets: Getting Health Care Close To Home

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Alexander Morales, who served in the Army in the 1970s, with his family: wife Roberta; Elvia, 7, Elena, 8, and Elvira, 7 (in front), and Ruben Verdugo, 13, and Aaron D. Huerta, 17 (in back). Morales' family has been going for years to the Stand Down event in San Diego, where veterans receive assistance. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Homeless Vets: They're Not Just Single Men Anymore

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