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Doyle's owner, Gerry Burke Jr., is selling the cafe's liquor license. The restaurant business has changed, and for Burke, the pub (shown here in 2015) is no longer viable. Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Bostonians Lament Loss Of 137-Year-Old Pub And Its Trove Of History

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At a ceremony Monday at the White House, President Trump defended his racist tweets against Democratic lawmakers. The language used in that tweet has a long history connected with nativist political movements. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

'Go Back Where You Came From': The Long Rhetorical Roots Of Trump's Racist Tweets

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Sadie Roberts-Joseph founded the Odell S. Williams Now & Then African American Museum in Baton Rouge, La., in 2001. She was a prominent civil rights activist and community leader. James Terry III/NAACP Baton Rouge Chapter hide caption

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James Terry III/NAACP Baton Rouge Chapter

A painting by John Trumbull titled Declaration of Independence hangs on the wall inside the U.S. Capitol on May 17, 2017. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

A July 4 NPR Tradition: A Reading Of The Declaration Of Independence

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A copy of the final edition of the Rocky Mountain News sits in a newspaper box on a street corner in Denver, Colorado. John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images

Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize

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Nora Carol Photography/Nora Carol Photography/AFP/Getty Images

Fake News: An Origin Story

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Phillip Waterman/Getty Images/Cultura RF

Radio Replay: This Is Your Brain On Ads

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A century ago, many new immigrants to the United States ended up returning home. And it often took a while for those who stayed to learn English and integrate into American society. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Huddled Masses And The Myth Of America

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Archivist Amy McDonald invited some co-workers to help her re-create cherries jubilee from a university cookbook. But even with a historical paper trail, there were still things they couldn't figure out, like what to do after it starts flaming. Jerry Young/Getty Images hide caption

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Jerry Young/Getty Images

The upstairs porch of Anne Blessing's home in Charleston, S.C., has been a stop on a popular historic home tour. For the first time, visitors will tour the kitchen where enslaved people once spent most of their lives toiling over hot fires. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Looking 'Beyond The Big House' And Into The Lives Of Slaves

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