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Radio Replay: This Is Your Brain On Ads

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A century ago, many new immigrants to the United States ended up returning home. And it often took a while for those who stayed to learn English and integrate into American society. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Huddled Masses And The Myth Of America

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Archivist Amy McDonald invited some co-workers to help her re-create cherries jubilee from a university cookbook. But even with a historical paper trail, there were still things they couldn't figure out, like what to do after it starts flaming. Jerry Young/Getty Images hide caption

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Jerry Young/Getty Images

The upstairs porch of Anne Blessing's home in Charleston, S.C., has been a stop on a popular historic home tour. For the first time, visitors will tour the kitchen where enslaved people once spent most of their lives toiling over hot fires. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Looking 'Beyond The Big House' And Into The Lives Of Slaves

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A group of men with full glasses proudly pose with their keg of beer in San Francisco, 1895. Underwood Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Underwood Archives/Getty Images

How The Story Of Beer Is The Story Of America

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Donald Trump plays a round of golf after the opening of The Trump International Golf Links Course on July 10, 2012, in Balmedie, Scotland. Ian MacNicol/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian MacNicol/Getty Images

Trump, The Golfer In Chief

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An Army horse wears a gas mask to guard against German gas attacks. Courtesy of U.S. National Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of U.S. National Archives

The Unsung Equestrian Heroes Of World War I And The Plot To Poison Them

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In 1957, Duncan Hines and his wife, Clara, cut a cake at the Duncan Hines test kitchen in Ithaca, N.Y. Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU hide caption

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Courtesy of Department of Special Collections-WKU

Ruby Lortie (center, wearing black), marches to get out the vote with other fifth-grade students from Boulder Community School of Integrated Studies in Boulder, Colo. Nathaniel Minor/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Nathaniel Minor/Colorado Public Radio

These Fifth-Graders Think It's Really, Really Important That You Vote

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A century ago, many new immigrants to the United States ended up returning home. And it often took a while for those who stayed to learn English and integrate into American society. Chad Riley/Getty Images hide caption

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Chad Riley/Getty Images

The Huddled Masses And The Myth Of America

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President Obama speaks during the dedication ceremony for the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in Washington. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

This version of Baked Alaska at Delmonico's restaurant in New York City stays true to the original: a walnut sponge cake layered with apricot compote and banana gelato, covered with torched meringue. Courtesy of Delmonico's Restaurant hide caption

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Courtesy of Delmonico's Restaurant