Elections Elections

Zeb Towne, the elected dogcatcher of Duxbury, Vt. "I'm the only person in the country who gets elected as a dogcatcher. So, I'm awesome, I guess," says Towne. Amy Kolb Noyes/Vermont Public Radio hide caption

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Amy Kolb Noyes/Vermont Public Radio

'You Couldn't Get Elected Dogcatcher!' No, Seriously

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A protestor wearing a sticker reading "Relax, look deep into my eyes and vote us" takes part in a march by the Hungarian satirical Two-Tailed Dog Party in Budapest on March 15. Ferenc Isza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ferenc Isza/AFP/Getty Images

Italian far-right League party leader Matteo Salvini gives the thumbs-up in Milan on Monday. Salvini said his right-wing coalition had the "right and the duty" to form a government after taking 37 percent of the vote in the weekend election. Piero Cruciatti/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Piero Cruciatti/AFP/Getty Images

Currently, polling places are largely a politics-free zone, but the Supreme Court heard arguments that could change that. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Should Polling Places Remain Politics-Free? Justices Incredulous At Both Sides

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A motorist guides his vehicle to a drop an election ballot at a drive-through collection site outside the election commission headquarters in Denver on Nov. 7, 2017. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Colorado Launches First In The Nation Post-Election Audits

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A sign appears outside the room where the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC, July 19, 2017. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Sebastian Kurz, Austria's foreign minister and leader of the conservative Austrian People's Party (OeVP), arrives at his party headquarters on Oct. 13 in Vienna. The OeVP is currently leading in polls. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Austria Election: Center-Right Party Head Likely Next Prime Minister

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Sen. Bernie Sanders during a campaign stop in Vallejo, Calif. ahead of California's June 2016 presidential primary. The state legislature is considering a bill to move the 2020 primary to March. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

California Seeks More Influence In 2020 Presidential Race

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President Trump speaks while flanked by Kansas Secretary of State, Kris Kobach (left) and Vice President Pence during the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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People vote on on November 8, 2016 in Los Angeles. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Making U.S. Elections More Secure Wouldn't Cost Much But No One Wants To Pay

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British Prime Minister and leader of the Conservative Party Theresa May, accompanied by her husband Philip, speaks outside No. 10 Downing St. in central London on Friday. Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

A view of a ballot scanner at a New York City Board of Elections voting machine facility warehouse just before last November's election. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

State And Local Officials Wary Of Federal Government's Election Security Efforts

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Arizona Cardinals fans wear masks of Presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton during the NFL game between the New York Jets and Arizona Cardinals Oct. 17, 2016. Norm Hall/Getty Images hide caption

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Norm Hall/Getty Images

Stop Lying, America. You Love Election 2016

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Polling station chairman helps a voter at a voting machine during the Republican presidential primary in February in West Columbia, S.C. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Rayford/Getty Images

After DNC Hack, Cybersecurity Experts Worry About Old Machines, Vote Tampering

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