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Turkey-backed Free Syrian Army soldiers celebrate around a statue of Kawa, a mythology figure in Kurdish culture as they prepare to destroy it in city center of Afrin, northwestern Syria, early Sunday. Hasan Kirmizitas/AP hide caption

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Hasan Kirmizitas/AP

Fighters with the Turkish-backed Free Syrian Army advance through a field southeast of Afrin on Tuesday. Ankara and its allies among the Syrian rebels said Tuesday they have surrounded the Kurdish-held Syrian border town. Hasan Kirmizitas/DHA-Depo Photos via AP hide caption

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Hasan Kirmizitas/DHA-Depo Photos via AP

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan shakes hands with local people in Port Sudan, Sudan, on Dec. 25, one of many locations in Africa the Turkish leader has visited recently. Kayhan Ozer/AP hide caption

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Kayhan Ozer/AP

Turkey Is Quietly Building Its Presence In Africa

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Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks in Ankara during the funeral prayers for Sgt. Musa Ozalkan, the first Turkish soldier to be killed in Turkey's cross-border "Operation Olive Branch" in northern Syria, on Tuesday. Kayhan Ozer/AP hide caption

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Kayhan Ozer/AP

A Pegasus Airlines Boeing 737 passenger plane is seen stuck in mud on an embankment, a day after skidding off the airstrip, after landing at Trabzon's airport on the Black Sea coast on Jan. 14. STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images

Sozcu, a Turkish daily newspaper seen in Ankara, runs Mehmet Hakan Atilla's conviction as front-page news on Thursday. Altan Gocher/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Altan Gocher/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Tuba and Cevheri Guven, both journalists, fled to Thessaloniki after being targeted by their own government. Turkey has imprisoned 262 journalists, making it the world's largest jailer of journalists. "If you write something on Twitter, you can go directly to prison," Tuba says. Joanna Kakissis/For NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/For NPR

Turks Fleeing To Greece Find Mostly Warm Welcome, Despite History

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Sevan Nisanyan was convicted and jailed for violating zoning laws in Sirince, his home village in western Turkey. Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic/AFP/Getty Images

Earthquake survivors look at a collapsed building in Istanbul in August 1999. The magnitude 7.4 quake killed 17,000 people across northwestern Turkey. Eyal Warshavsky/AP hide caption

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Eyal Warshavsky/AP

18 Years After Turkey's Deadly Quake, Safety Concerns Grow About The Next Big One

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Khaleed Khatib was the videographer for the Oscar-winning Netflix documentary The White Helmets. "This photo was after double tap of aircraft on July 27, 2014," he says, referring to an airstrike followed by another attack. "I don't know how I survived." Fadi al Halabi/Courtesy of Khaleed Khatib hide caption

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Fadi al Halabi/Courtesy of Khaleed Khatib