Turkey Turkey

Sakine Arat, right, and Mayrem Bulut are Kurdish mothers camping out between Turkish amry forces and the Kurdish PKK militants, in hopes of preventing clashes. "Mothers on both sides should be doing this," says Arat, 80. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

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Peter Kenyon/NPR

Kurdish Activists Camp Out Between Turkey's Army And Kurdish Fighters

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People gather outside a damaged building after clashes in Silvan between Turkish security forces and members of the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) youth wing last week. Sertac Kayar/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Sertac Kayar/Reuters/Landov

In Turkey, A Kurdish Conflict Flares — Again

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Migrants from Africa receive instruction in French in the port city of Calais. Some 3,000 migrants live in a makeshift camp known as "The Jungle." Most are seeking to travel on to Britain, while some are seeking asylum in France. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

U.S. soldiers stand beside a Patriot missile system at a Turkish military base in Gaziantep, southeastern Turkey, last October. In a joint statement, Washington and Ankara said the missiles would be withdrawn for updating and modernization. Osman Orsal/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Osman Orsal/Reuters/Landov

Girls plays basketball at a school for nearly 2,000 Syrian refugees in Reyhanli, in southern Turkey. The schools, which depends on private donations, is struggling to remain open. The students attend in five separate shifts throughout the day. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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Deborah Amos/NPR

A Syrian Refugee School: Nearly 2,000 Students, 5 Shifts, 3 Languages

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Flags of member nations wave outside NATO headquarters in Brussels. For just the fifth time in its 66-year history, NATO ambassadors met in an emergency, Article 4 session to gauge the threat that the so-called Islamic State poses to Turkey. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

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Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP

A U.S. Air Force plane takes off as a Turkish air force fighter jet taxis at the Incirlik airbase, southern Turkey, in 2013. Reversing an earlier policy, Ankara has agreed to allow the U.S.-led coalition to fly anti-ISIS airstrikes from the base. Vadim Ghirda/AP hide caption

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Vadim Ghirda/AP

"What we are doing now has nothing to do with what we expected to be doing," says Rami Jarrah, who protested against the Assad regime in Damascus in 2011 and now runs a radio station from southern Turkey that broadcasts to civilians in rebel-controlled territory in northern Syria. Alison Meuse/NPR hide caption

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Alison Meuse/NPR

As Challenges Shift, Syria's Moderates Navigate Unexpected Territory

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Syrian Kurds from Kobani wait behind the border fences to cross into Turkey on Friday. An attack by Islamic State fighters on the Syrian town of Kobani and a nearby village has so far killed at least 146 civilians, the second-biggest massacre by the hardline group in the country, a conflict monitor said on Friday. Murad Sezer/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Murad Sezer/Reuters/Landov

Pages bookstore partner and manager Samer al-Kadri (center) talks with customers. The Syrian founded a publishing company in Damascus, but fled when the war made it impossible to run. He wound up in Istanbul, where he noticed a lack of books in Arabic, and took it upon himself to serve the community. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

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Peter Kenyon/NPR

Istanbul Bookstore Caters To Syrian Refugees In Need Of A Good Read

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Supporters celebrate early election results outside the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) headquarters in Istanbul. The ruling Justice and Development Party, or AKP, has lost its majority according to preliminary results. Murad Sezer/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Murad Sezer/Reuters/Landov

The remains of an inflatable boat that passed illegally from the coast of Turkey rest in October 2014 on the shore 10 miles from Mytilene, Greece. Thirty-four immigrants from Syria, among them one woman and three children, made a dangerous night journey Sept. 26. Orestis Panagiotou/EPA/LANDOV hide caption

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Orestis Panagiotou/EPA/LANDOV

On Patrol With The Greek Coast Guard, On The Lookout For Migrants

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Armenian Christian women pray at St. Giragos Church in southeastern Turkey. The restored church, reopened in 2011, is the largest Armenian church in the Middle East. Sertac Kayar/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Sertac Kayar/Reuters/Landov

Invisible For Generations, 'Hidden Armenians' Emerge In Turkey

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