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Nazmiye Cakir, a 60-year-old "bird whistler," learned the whistled language from her grandparents, and still uses it. "The one thing you don't whistle about is your love talk," she says with a laugh, "because you'll get caught!" Gokce Saracoglu/for NPR hide caption

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Gokce Saracoglu/for NPR

In A Turkish Village, A Conversation With Whistles, Not Words

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Syrian refugee woman cries by one of her children as she and family members arrive in an overcrowded dinghy on the Greek island of Lesbos after crossing a part of the Aegean Sea from the Turkish coast, on Saturday. Yannis Behrakis/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Yannis Behrakis/Reuters/Landov

Selma Halik, holding her 2-year-old daughter Amara at a refugee camp on the Greek island of Lesbos, says much of her family was wiped out by ISIS. She doesn't want her daughter to see the things she's seen. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

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Peter Kenyon/NPR

On Greek Island, Syrians And Iraqis Find Respite Before Moving On

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Refugees and migrants on the Greek island of Lesbos enjoy the sea. Alkis Konstantinidis/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Alkis Konstantinidis/Reuters/Landov

For Syrian Migrants, Many Reasons To Leave Turkey For Europe

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Relatives of 3-year-old Syrian Kurdish boy Aylan Kurdi carry his body during a funeral procession for Aylan, his mother, Rehan, and his older brother, Galip, in Kobani, Syria, on Friday. Sipan Ibrahim/AP hide caption

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Sipan Ibrahim/AP

A Turkish paramilitary police officer carries the body of 3-year-old Aylan Kurdi, found washed ashore near the Turkish resort of Bodrum early Wednesday. The boats carrying the boy's family to the Greek island of Kos capsized. His 5-year-old brother and mother also lost their lives. DHA/AP hide caption

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DHA/AP

That Little Syrian Boy: Here's Who He Was

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Sakine Arat, right, and Mayrem Bulut are Kurdish mothers camping out between Turkish amry forces and the Kurdish PKK militants, in hopes of preventing clashes. "Mothers on both sides should be doing this," says Arat, 80. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

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Peter Kenyon/NPR

Kurdish Activists Camp Out Between Turkey's Army And Kurdish Fighters

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People gather outside a damaged building after clashes in Silvan between Turkish security forces and members of the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) youth wing last week. Sertac Kayar/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Sertac Kayar/Reuters/Landov

In Turkey, A Kurdish Conflict Flares — Again

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Migrants from Africa receive instruction in French in the port city of Calais. Some 3,000 migrants live in a makeshift camp known as "The Jungle." Most are seeking to travel on to Britain, while some are seeking asylum in France. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

U.S. soldiers stand beside a Patriot missile system at a Turkish military base in Gaziantep, southeastern Turkey, last October. In a joint statement, Washington and Ankara said the missiles would be withdrawn for updating and modernization. Osman Orsal/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Osman Orsal/Reuters/Landov

Girls plays basketball at a school for nearly 2,000 Syrian refugees in Reyhanli, in southern Turkey. The schools, which depends on private donations, is struggling to remain open. The students attend in five separate shifts throughout the day. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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Deborah Amos/NPR

A Syrian Refugee School: Nearly 2,000 Students, 5 Shifts, 3 Languages

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Flags of member nations wave outside NATO headquarters in Brussels. For just the fifth time in its 66-year history, NATO ambassadors met in an emergency, Article 4 session to gauge the threat that the so-called Islamic State poses to Turkey. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

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Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP

A U.S. Air Force plane takes off as a Turkish air force fighter jet taxis at the Incirlik airbase, southern Turkey, in 2013. Reversing an earlier policy, Ankara has agreed to allow the U.S.-led coalition to fly anti-ISIS airstrikes from the base. Vadim Ghirda/AP hide caption

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Vadim Ghirda/AP