Doping Doping

Aleksandr Krushelnitckii, seen during the bronze medal game against Norway last week. The Olympian from Russia won that mixed doubles bronze — but had the medal stripped Thursday for testing positive for a banned substance. Ronald Martinez/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

Aleksandr Krushelnitckii, seen here competing with his teammate and wife Anastasia Bryzgalova, has tested positive for a banned substance, the Olympic Athletes from Russia says. The pair won a bronze medal at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. Ronald Martinez/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

Aleksandr Krushelnitckii of the Olympic Athletes from Russia team is now the subject of an official anti-doping investigation, the Court of Arbitration for Sport said on Monday. He's seen here delivering a stone against Norway in the curling mixed doubles bronze medal game at the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games — a match the team from Russia won. Jamie Squire/Getty Images hide caption

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Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Bronze medalist Aleksandr Krushelnitckii is under suspicion for a failed drug test at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. He's seen here with his wife and Olympic Athletes from Russia curling teammate Anastasia Bryzgalova, as they received their bronze medals. Sergei Bobylev/Sergei Bobylev/TASS hide caption

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Sergei Bobylev/Sergei Bobylev/TASS

Russia's gold medal winner Alexander Legkov kisses his medal during the closing ceremony for the men's 50-kilometer cross-country race in Feb. 2014, in Sochi, Russia. Legkov is one of 28 athletes who have had their doping convictions overturned by a Swiss tribunal. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

The World Anti-Doping Agency says it has acquired more than three years of testing data from the lab, in the building pictured here, which WADA says was the site of a state doping program of Russian athletes. Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images

Dallas Seavey poses with his lead dogs Reef (left) and Tide after finishing the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Nome, Alaska, in March 2016. Seavey denies he administered banned drugs to his dogs in this year's race and has withdrawn from the 2018 race in protest. Mark Thiessen/AP hide caption

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Mark Thiessen/AP

Maria Sharapova during her quarterfinal match at the Australian Open tennis tournament in January. A drug test Sharapova took during the event later came back positive for the banned substance meldonium. Rick Rycroft/AP hide caption

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Rick Rycroft/AP

Russian tennis star Maria Sharapova isn't competing at the 2016 Olympics. At a March 7 press conference in Los Angeles, she told reporters she'd tested positive for meldonium, a prescription heart drug that improves blood flow. It was banned in January by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Olympic Athletes Still Use Some Rx Drugs As A Path To 'Legal Doping'

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