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Natalie Lynch at a relative's home with her youngest child, Maycen. In 2014, when Lynch was pregnant with her older child, she spent two weeks before giving birth in a prison cell, mostly alone. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Pregnant, Locked Up, And Alone

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JPMorgan Chase will pay $5 million to hundreds, possibly thousands, of men who filed for primary caregiver leave and were denied in the last seven years. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

A Dad Wins Fight To Increase Parental Leave For Men At JPMorgan Chase

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Juan Carlos Perla of El Salvador kisses his 10-month-old son, Joshua, inside a migrant shelter in Tijuana, Mexico, where they await their asylum hearing in San Diego. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Facebook announced Wednesday that it will ban white nationalism and separatism content starting next week. "It's clear that these concepts are deeply linked to organized hate groups and have no place on our services," it said. Oli Scarff /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff /AFP/Getty Images

Migrants walk to the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana, Mexico, last week to make requests for political asylum. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Trump Administration Faces 2 Legal Challenges For Asylum Restrictions

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Women and children walk to a bus in McAllen, Texas. People released from immigration detention centers are often dropped off at the McAllen bus station nearby. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

The American Civil Liberties Union says that Amazon Rekognition, facial recognition software sold online, inaccurately identified lawmakers and poses threats to civil rights — charges that Amazon denies. Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

Ruben Garcia (center), director of the Annunciation House, speaks with migrant parents on June 26, 2018, in El Paso, Texas. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Trump Officials Struggle To Meet Deadlines Even As More Migrant Families Reunited

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A protester holds a sign outside a closed gate at the Port of Entry facility, last week in Fabens, Texas, where tent shelters are being used to house separated family members. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

An image from a presentaton by Amazon's Ranju Das shows a demonstration of real-time facial recognition and tracking. Das said the video came from a traffic cam in Orlando, Fla., where police were in a pilot program of Amazon's Rekognition service. Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Children and workers are seen at a tent encampment on June 19, 2018 in Tornillo, Texas. The Trump administration is using the tent facility to house immigrant children separated from their parents. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Central American immigrants depart ICE custody, pending future immigration court hearings, on June 11 in McAllen, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Trump's Migrant Family Policy Now Moves To The Courts

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Andrea Elena Castro, daughter of Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, holds a U.S. flag during a Rally For Our Children event on May 31 to protest the "zero tolerance" immigration policy that has led to the separation of families. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

ACLU of Iowa legal director Rita Bettis, shown with Emma Goldman Clinic attorney Sam Jones, said a judge's decision to temporarily block Iowa's newly passed abortion law removes uncertainty as a legal challenge to the law proceeds. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

The American Civil Liberties Union says that U.S. immigration authorities have unfairly separated hundreds of parents, most of them asylum seekers, from their young children. Paul J. Richards /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards /AFP/Getty Images

Dollar Band, The Men, Palberta, Pop. 1280, Profligate, Alice Cohen, Blanche Blanche Blanche, Merchandise and more appear on the ACLU Benefit Compilation. Courtesy of Emma Kohlmann hide caption

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Courtesy of Emma Kohlmann