ACLU ACLU
Stories About

ACLU

Migrants walk to the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana, Mexico, last week to make requests for political asylum. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

Trump Administration Faces 2 Legal Challenges For Asylum Restrictions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/668824846/669404142" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Women and children walk to a bus in McAllen, Texas. People released from immigration detention centers are often dropped off at the McAllen bus station nearby. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

The American Civil Liberties Union says that Amazon Rekognition, facial recognition software sold online, inaccurately identified lawmakers and poses threats to civil rights — charges that Amazon denies. Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images

Ruben Garcia (center), director of the Annunciation House, speaks with migrant parents on June 26, 2018, in El Paso, Texas. Matt York/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt York/AP

Trump Officials Struggle To Meet Deadlines Even As More Migrant Families Reunited

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/628546630/628546631" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A protester holds a sign outside a closed gate at the Port of Entry facility, last week in Fabens, Texas, where tent shelters are being used to house separated family members. Matt York/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt York/AP

An image from a presentaton by Amazon's Ranju Das shows a demonstration of real-time facial recognition and tracking. Das said the video came from a traffic cam in Orlando, Fla., where police were in a pilot program of Amazon's Rekognition service. Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Amazon Web Services Korea via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Children and workers are seen at a tent encampment on June 19, 2018 in Tornillo, Texas. The Trump administration is using the tent facility to house immigrant children separated from their parents. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Central American immigrants depart ICE custody, pending future immigration court hearings, on June 11 in McAllen, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

Trump's Migrant Family Policy Now Moves To The Courts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/622414994/622475157" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Andrea Elena Castro, daughter of Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, holds a U.S. flag during a Rally For Our Children event on May 31 to protest the "zero tolerance" immigration policy that has led to the separation of families. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP

ACLU of Iowa legal director Rita Bettis, shown with Emma Goldman Clinic attorney Sam Jones, said a judge's decision to temporarily block Iowa's newly passed abortion law removes uncertainty as a legal challenge to the law proceeds. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charlie Neibergall/AP