Mexico Mexico

A Socorro dove perches at the Africam Safari Zoo in Puebla, Mexico. Scientists are planning to bring the dove species back to Socorro Island, the dove's ancestral home. Loretta Williams for NPR hide caption

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Loretta Williams for NPR

Move Over, Sheep. Doves Are Returning Home To Tiny Island Of Socorro

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Newspapers in Mexico City on Thursday featured headlines about President Trump's proposed border wall and his insistence that Mexico will foot the bill. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

A truck drives near the Mexico-U.S. border fence, on the Mexican side, separating the towns of Anapra, Mexico, and Sunland Park, N.M., Wednesday. Christian Torres/AP hide caption

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Christian Torres/AP

Mexico's President Enrique Peña Nieto speaks during a news conference in Mexico City on Monday. He is waiting to hear from high-level negotiators before deciding whether to cancel his U.S. trip. Marco Ugarte/AP hide caption

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Marco Ugarte/AP

As Trump Orders Border Wall, Mexico's President Mulls Canceling U.S. Trip

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This fence, made of circa-Vietnam War era surplus landing mats, ends at Otay Mesa about 15 miles east of the Pacific Ocean. Tijuana is on the left and California on the right. There are two other kinds of fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border: steel mesh and concrete-filled steel beams. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Southern Border Wall: Campaign Slogan Meets Reality

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President-elect Donald Trump tours the Carrier Corp. in Indianapolis following the company's announcement it would keep hundreds of manufacturing jobs in the United States rather than move them to Mexico. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images

U.S. Manufacturers Brace For Trump's Next Trade Targets

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A man walks past a nearly deserted construction site Wednesday in Villa de Reyes, San Luis Potosi, Mexico, as workers shut down operations and remove equipment from the site of a canceled $1.6 billion Ford plant. Ford's cancellation, which costs the region thousands of projected jobs, has sounded alarms in Mexico and sent its currency tumbling. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Canceled Ford Plant Adds To Mexico's Economic Frustrations

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Rubi Ibarra dances during her 15th birthday celebrations in Villa Guadalupe, Mexico, on Monday. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images

Antonino Fernandez was born in 1917 in the village of Cerezales del Condado, in Spain's northern León province. Until his health deteriorated about five years ago, Fernandez came from Mexico to visit his hometown most summers. He and his wife had no children and were generous with financial help to distant relatives and former neighbors. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

A Spanish Village Stays Afloat, Thanks To Corona Beer Tycoon

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Haitian nationals at a Mexican government immigration office near the port of entry between Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, and Nogales, Ariz., wait day after day for appointments with U.S. immigration agents so they can enter. As a result of the Haitian influx and a continuing surge of Central Americans on the Texas-Mexico border, the U.S. government has run out of detention space. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

At The U.S.-Mexico Border, Haitians Arrive To A Harsh Reception

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