Mexico Mexico

Ocellated turkeys stand out for their bright blue heads and iridescent feathers. They're still around the Yucatan today. Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

Former Mexican President Vicente Fox spoke with NPR about his book, Let's Move On: Beyond Fear & False Prophets. The book highlights the North American Free Trade Agreement between the U.S., Mexico and Canada. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Former Mexican President To Trump: 'If You Want To Build A Wall, Waste Your Money'

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Spent bullet casings litter a road after authorities reported a gunbattle outside Mazatlan, Mexico, in July 2017, a year marked by the highest homicides in at least decades. Mario Rivera Alvarado/AP hide caption

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Mario Rivera Alvarado/AP

A Mexican soldier piles poppies for incineration near the town of Tlacotepec, in Guerrero state, Mexico. The army says it slashes and burns poppy when fields are too difficult to access by helicopter or when it wants to protect fruits and vegetables growing nearby. James Fredrick for NPR hide caption

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James Fredrick for NPR

On The Hunt For Poppies In Mexico — America's Biggest Heroin Supplier

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Mexican journalist Javier Valdez lies on the street after he was shot dead in Sinaloa, Mexico, on May 15, 2017. The U.S. State Department is telling Americans to completely avoid five Mexican states because of rising crime and violence. FERNANDO BRITO/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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FERNANDO BRITO/AFP/Getty Images

These are some of the books from the study. From left: The Cat That Eats Letters by Ge Jing. The Foolish Old Man Who Removed The Mountain by Cai Feng. The Jar of Happiness by Aisla Burrows. from left: Shandong Education Press; Shanghai people's Fine Arts Publishing House; Child's Play International. hide caption

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from left: Shandong Education Press; Shanghai people's Fine Arts Publishing House; Child's Play International.

What's The Difference Between Children's Books In China And The U.S.?

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People pray next to the coffin of slain journalist Gumaro Pérez Aguilando during his wake at his mother's home in Acayucan, Veracruz state, Mexico, on Wednesday. Felix Marquez/AP hide caption

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Felix Marquez/AP

Number Of Journalists Killed In Mexico Reaches 'Historical High,' Report Says

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Mexican police officers stand guard near the tour bus that overturned Tuesday morning in Quintana Roo state. Twelve people were killed, including 8 Americans. Maneul Jesus Ortega Canche/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Maneul Jesus Ortega Canche/AFP/Getty Images

Graciela Garcia, 19, married her high school friend, Jaime, when she was 15. Natasha Pizzey hide caption

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Natasha Pizzey

Why Child Marriage Persists In Mexico

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Tourists enjoy the beach in Tulum National Park in Mexico's Riviera Maya region. Some travelers have raised concerns about safety at some resorts in the region, including in a forum post on TripAdvisor this summer asking about blackouts and the risk of assault, rape or robbery. Daniel Slim/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Slim/AFP/Getty Images

The Mexican long-tongued bat is one of the species that pollinates agave, but its ecosystem is being disrupted by large-scale, cheaper methods of making tequila. Merlin Tuttle/Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation hide caption

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Merlin Tuttle/Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation

Bats And Tequila: A Once Boo-tiful Relationship Cursed By Growing Demands

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10-Year-Old Girl Is Detained By Border Patrol After Emergency Surgery

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In trying to get people to eat the Pez Diablo, or suckermouth catfish, sustainable fisheries specialist Mike Mitchell says it isn't "a problem of biology or science, but marketing." DeAgostini/Getty Images hide caption

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DeAgostini/Getty Images