Mexico Mexico

The Mexican long-tongued bat is one of the species that pollinates agave, but its ecosystem is being disrupted by large-scale, cheaper methods of making tequila. Merlin Tuttle/Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation hide caption

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Merlin Tuttle/Merlin Tuttle's Bat Conservation

Bats And Tequila: A Once Boo-tiful Relationship Cursed By Growing Demands

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10-Year-Old Girl Is Detained By Border Patrol After Emergency Surgery

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In trying to get people to eat the Pez Diablo, or suckermouth catfish, sustainable fisheries specialist Mike Mitchell says it isn't "a problem of biology or science, but marketing." DeAgostini/Getty Images hide caption

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DeAgostini/Getty Images

Chip Councell's ancestors began farming on Maryland's Eastern Shore in 1690. He says that in today's world, U.S. farmers have to look abroad for markets. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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John Ydstie/NPR

As Trump Moves To Renegotiate NAFTA, U.S. Farmers Are Hopeful But Nervous

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The Sardar Sweet Shop in Varanasi, India, was built around a neem tree considered too holy to cut down. Customers flow in and out, barely noticing the imposing tree. In rural parts, people use the neem tree's leaves to repel insects, the sap for stomach pain and the branches to brush their teeth. As for the candy shop sweets, Diane Cook says they were "fabulous." Diane Cook and Len Jenshel hide caption

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Diane Cook and Len Jenshel

Relatives of people who are presumed still buried beneath the rubble await news of rescue efforts in Mexico City on Tuesday. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images

The work built by French artist JR peers over the U.S.-Mexico border at Tecate, Calif., earlier this week. Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images

As Boy Peers Curiously Over Border Wall, His Artist Asks: 'What Is He Thinking?'

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A forecast map from the National Hurricane Center shows the path of Franklin, which made landfall as a hurricane on eastern Mexico's coast early Thursday. National Hurricane Center hide caption

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National Hurricane Center

Fishermen move their boats, normally moored in the Gulf of Mexico, onto a coastal road to protect them ahead of the arrival of Tropical Storm Franklin, in the port city of Veracruz, Mexico, on Wednesday. Felix Marquez/AP hide caption

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Felix Marquez/AP

Gabriel Zepeda (right) makes an all-terrain wheelchair. He's been making wheelchairs for low-income Mexicans for 27 years. Mónica Ortiz Uribe for NPR hide caption

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Mónica Ortiz Uribe for NPR

Mexico And U.S. Team Up To Create Low-Cost Wheelchairs

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Archaeologists working at the Templo Mayor site of Aztec ruins in Mexico City, in August 2015. Scientists say the remains of women and children are among those found at a main trophy rack of human skulls, known as "tzompantli." Hector Montano/AP hide caption

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Hector Montano/AP