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Smoke from burning cars rises in Culiacán, Mexico, on Thursday, after an intense gunfight between security forces and gunmen linked to the Sinaloa drug cartel. Hector Parra/AP hide caption

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Hector Parra/AP

Massive Gun Battle Erupts In Mexico Over Son Of Drug Kingpin 'El Chapo'

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Democratic presidential candidate Julián Castro walked with a group of asylum-seekers and their lawyers from Mexico to Texas on Monday. Hours later, CBP released the asylum-seekers back into Mexico. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Pedestrians on the Puerta Mexico bridge, which crosses the Rio Grande, wait to enter Brownsville, Texas, at a legal port of entry in Matamoros, Mexico, in August. Emilio Espejel/AP hide caption

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Emilio Espejel/AP

Since taking office last December, Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has not left his country. Critics say he is damaging Mexico's image on the world stage. Above, he speaks during the daily morning press briefing in Mexico City on Sept. 5. Pedro Martin Gonzalez Castillo/Getty Images hide caption

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Pedro Martin Gonzalez Castillo/Getty Images

Twelve-year-old Jesús Ruiz grieves as he stands before the coffin containing the remains of his father, Mexican journalist Jorge Celestino Ruiz Vazquez, in Actopan, Veracruz, on Aug. 3. The Committee to Protect Journalists said Ruiz Vazquez was the third journalist killed in a single week in Mexico. Felix Marquez/AP hide caption

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Felix Marquez/AP

12 Journalists Have Been Killed In Mexico This Year, The World's Highest Toll

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Designer Isaac Mizrahi (left) embraces Robert D'Loren, CEO of Xcel Brands, which once manufactured 70% of its clothes in China. Today that's down to about 20%. The company now manufacturers in a variety of countries, including Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

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Brendan McDermid/Reuters

China Falls Out Of Fashion For Some U.S. Brands

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A special response team with Customs and Border Protection drills on the international bridge between Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, in the event that desperate migrants rush the port of entry. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Criminals Target Migrants In Mexico Seeking U.S. Asylum

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A group representing importers said it was gratified that the Trump administration is lifting the tariffs on Mexican tomatoes. But it cautioned that beefed-up inspections could act as another barrier to free trade. Anna-Rose Gassot/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna-Rose Gassot/AFP/Getty Images

A set of pink seesaws allowed people to share some fun along the U.S.-Mexico border wall this week. Here, a woman helps her little girls ride the seesaw that was installed near Ciudad de Juarez, Mexico. Christian Chavez/AP hide caption

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Christian Chavez/AP

This costume, with corn husks and feathers and paper flowers, is worn by a member of a dance group that gathers in cemeteries and other places to mark Day of the Dead festivities (called Xantolo, the word written above the mask). The idea of combining a skeletal mask with European fashion was devised by the Mexican artist Jose Guadalupe Posada, who lived in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Phyllis Galembo hide caption

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Phyllis Galembo

Guatemalan migrant Lety Pérez embraces her son, Anthony, while pleading with a Mexican National Guard member to let them cross into the United States, near Juárez, Mexico, on Monday. Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters hide caption

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Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Tania and her husband, Joseph, initially had to stay just across the border in Mexico under a Trump administration program that requires thousands of people to wait in northern Mexico cities while their immigration cases are heard in U.S. courts. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Joaquin Guzmán, also known as "El Chapo," was sentenced Wednesday to a life term in prison plus 30 years. After the sentencing in a Brooklyn courthouse, U.S. attorneys and other officials greeted the media, including Ariana Fajardo Orshan, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Florida. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

Mexican Drug Kingpin 'El Chapo' Is Sentenced To Life Plus 30 Years In U.S. Prison

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