Mexico Mexico

Pablo Cote holds a photo of his deceased father of the same name in July 2013 in Tlaxcala, Mexico. Cote was kidnapped while driving back from the U.S. border to the east-central state of Tlaxcala. He was beaten to death, part of the mass killing of 193 bus passengers and other travelers by the Zetas. Ivan Pierre Aguirre/AP hide caption

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Ivan Pierre Aguirre/AP

Relatives of 43 students who went missing in Iguala, Mexico, search for them on a hill on the outskirts of town on Nov. 29. After the students vanished, searches around Iguala have turned up nearly a dozen clandestine graves. None of the remains found in those mounds belonged to the students. Eduardo Verdugo/AP hide caption

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Eduardo Verdugo/AP

Search For Missing Students In Mexico Turns Up Graves Of Others

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Maria Isabel de la Paz, a U.S. citizen, was twice turned away when trying to enter the U.S. legally. When she attempted an illegal crossing, her case was decided by a Border Patrol agent, not an immigration judge. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Born In The U.S. But Turned Back At The Border, Time After Time

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Natividad de la Cruz Bartolo shows a picture of her son, Emiliano, one of 43 university students who went missing months ago. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

Postcard From Mexico: Mother Clings To Hope That Students Are Still Alive

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A woman walks toward the international crossing gate in Nogales, Ariz., in March 2013. Jahi Chikwendiu/Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Jahi Chikwendiu/Washington Post via Getty Images

Some Deportees Return To Mexico But Their Stuff Stays In The U.S.

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Burnt Remains Of Missing Mexican Student Identified; 42 Still Not Found

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Nabor, a small-scale marijuana grower in the northwestern Mexican state of Sinoloa, checks his plants. As legal pot increasingly becomes available in the U.S., Americans appear to be buying more that is grown domestically. Prices for marijuana from Mexico have fallen sharply. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Legal Pot In The U.S. May Be Undercutting Mexican Marijuana

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Mexico's Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam addresses a news conference in Mexico City on Friday. He announced the arrest of three suspects in the brutal slaying of 43 students in the country's south. Mario Guzman/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Mario Guzman/EPA/Landov

Dubbed the "imperial couple" by a Mexican newspaper, the mayor of Iguala, Jose Luis Abarca, and his wife Maria de los Angeles Pineda were wanted for questioning in the case of the missing students and the mass graves found near Iguala. They are shown here in a photo taken in May. Alejandrino Gonzalez/AP hide caption

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Alejandrino Gonzalez/AP

Jill Tahmooressi stands outside the Mexican Consulate in Miami, in May to protest the arrest of her son in Mexico. He was released by a federal judge in Mexico today. J Pat Carter/AP hide caption

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J Pat Carter/AP

Three large crosses lean against the burned out facade of Iguala's City Hall. Masked protesters angry about the disappearance of 43 students — attacked on orders of Iguala's mayor, according to Mexican federal authorities — burned the building last week. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

With Mexican Students Missing, A Festive Holiday Turns Somber

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Elaborately decorated skulls are crafted from pure sugar and given to friends as gifts. The colorful designs represent the vitality of life and individual personality. Karen Castillo Farfán /NPR hide caption

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Karen Castillo Farfán /NPR