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In this file photo, Dr. Jose Manuel Mireles speaks during an interview Dec. 1, 2013. Mireles is one of the subjects of the new film Cartel Land which follows vigilante groups fighting drug gangs. Omar Torres/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Torres/AFP/Getty Images

'Cartel Land' Follows Vigilantes Fighting Mexican Drug Gangs

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A Mexican soldier stands guard next to marijuana packages in Tijuana following the discovery of a tunnel under the U.S.-Mexico border in 2010. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images

'Narconomics': How The Drug Cartels Operate Like Wal-Mart And McDonald's

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Pope Francis waves from the popemobile upon arrival in Ecatepec — a rough, crime-plagued Mexico City suburb — on Sunday. Pope Francis has chosen to visit some of Mexico's most troubled regions during his five-day trip to the country. Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images

Riot police were deployed Wednesday night outside Topo Chico prison in Monterrey, Mexico, where at least 52 people died in rioting and a fire. Francisco Cobos/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francisco Cobos/AFP/Getty Images

Walter Thompson-Hernandez displays a photograph of his parents, Kerry Thompson and Ellie Hernandez. Thompson-Hernandez identifies as a "blaxican" — another term for Afro-Mexican, the identity soon to be included on the Mexican census for the first time. Walter Thompson-Hernandez hide caption

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Walter Thompson-Hernandez

Now Counted By Their Country, Afro-Mexicans Grab Unprecedented Spotlight

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A vendor shows a t-shirt with the face of Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán for sale in Mexico City on July 20, 2015. ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ALFREDO ESTRELLA/AFP/Getty Images

'People Are Still Dying On The Streets' In Mexico's Drug War

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Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán was captured by Mexican marines on Friday. He now faces extradition to the U.S., though it will likely be a lengthy process. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Mexican drug kingpin Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán, seen here in a photo held by Mexico's attorney general, Arely Gomez, last July, has been recaptured, Mexico's president says. Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images

Children light candles during an overnight vigil at a protest camp in Juarez, Mexico, outside the manufacturing plant for the American-owned printer company Lexmark. Mónica Ortiz Uribe/KJZZ hide caption

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Mónica Ortiz Uribe/KJZZ

Mexican Border Workers Make A Push To Unionize

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The walking bridge at the Cross Border Xpress air terminal in San Diego links the U.S. and Mexico. The terminal began operations on Wednesday. Lenny Ignelzi/AP hide caption

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Lenny Ignelzi/AP

Listen To Jean Guerrero's Full Report

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Eduardo Gonzalez is HIV positive. His mother died of AIDS; his father, who's HIV positive, is in jail. The boy lives at Eunime, a Tijuana facility for children whose parents have faced AIDS in their family and who may themselves be infected. Courtesy of Malcolm Linton hide caption

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Courtesy of Malcolm Linton