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In late January, Carlos Catarldo Gomez of Honduras was the first person returned to Mexico to wait for his asylum trial date. The Trump administration announced on Tuesday that this program, dubbed 'Migrant Protection Protocols,' will expand from San Diego to Calexico, Calif. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán faced 10 charges in the indictment, including engaging in a criminal enterprise — which in itself comprised 27 violations, including conspiracy to commit murder. U.S. law enforcement via AP hide caption

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U.S. law enforcement via AP

In Mexican border towns, big discount drugstores, as well as small pharmacies like this one in Tijuana, market their less expensive medicines to American tourists. Guillermo Arias/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/Bloomberg via Getty Images

American Travelers Seek Cheaper Prescription Drugs In Mexico And Beyond

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Carlos Catarldo Gomez, of Honduras, center, is escorted by Mexican officials after leaving the United States, the first person returned to Mexico to wait for his asylum trial date, in Tijuana, Mexico Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Children of Mexican immigrants wait to receive a free health checkup inside a mobile clinic at the Mexican Consulate in Denver, Colo., in 2009. The Trump administration wants to ratchet up scrutiny of the use of social services by immigrants. That's already led some worried parents to avoid family health care. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Fear Of Deportation Or Green Card Denial Deters Some Parents From Getting Kids Care

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Forensic personnel load the corpse of a man into a van, after he was executed at a shopping mall in Acapulco, Mexico, on April 24, 2018. A new report recorded more than 33,000 homicides in 2018, making it the country's deadliest on record. Francisco Robles/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francisco Robles/AFP/Getty Images

Verlon Jose, vice chairman of the Tohono O'odham Nation, says President Trump's proposed wall would devastate his community. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Native American Leader: 'A Wall Is Not The Answer'

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Firefighters work to extinguish a massive blaze triggered by a leaking pipeline in Tlahuelilpan, Mexico on Friday night. Mexico's health minister said at least 89 people were killed. Francisco Villeda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Francisco Villeda/AFP/Getty Images

Theft From Fuel Pipelines Is A Rampant, Deadly Problem In Mexico

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Karen Paz hugs her daughter, Liliana Saray, 9. They are from San Pedro Sula, Honduras. "I feel free; I feel different," Paz said. "I don't have someone who imposes his views and his ways on me. I am not scared someone will come and attack me, like I used to be." Federica Valabrega hide caption

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Federica Valabrega

Motorists wait in line for hours to buy gasoline at a Pemex service station in Guadalajara, Mexico, on Sunday. The Mexican president temporarily closed some of the state oil company's pipelines, in a bid to wipe out rampant fuel theft. Ulises Ruiz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ulises Ruiz/AFP/Getty Images