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Trucks line up to cross to the United States near the Otay Commercial port of entry on the Mexican side of the U.S.-Mexico border on Jan. 25. Trump now says he will renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, which he has long criticized, rather than scrap it. Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/AFP/Getty Images

A view from the International bridge between Presidio, Texas, and Ojinaga, Mexico, shows the flooded checkpoint between the two cities on Sept. 17, 2008. A levee broke and water from the Rio Grande inundated parts of the city with 10 feet of water. Walt Frerck/AP hide caption

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Walt Frerck/AP

Mexico Worries That A New Border Wall Will Worsen Flooding

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Police investigators work on the crime scene where Mexican journalist Maximino Rodriguez Palacios was killed by gunmen April 14 in La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

A 73-Year-Old Is Latest Victim Of Deadly Attacks On Mexican Journalists

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Javier Duarte, the former governor of the Mexican state of Veracruz, sits handcuffed following his arrest in Panajache, Guatemala, on Saturday. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

A chile-rubbed pork taco is topped with french fries in the Merced market in Mexico City. The taco costs 10 pesos — less than 50 cents. Cheap, high-calorie food is contributing to Mexico's obesity problem. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption

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Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR

Pork Tacos Topped With Fries: Fuel For Mexico's Diabetes Epidemic

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Dr. Tonatiuh Barrientos Gutierrez, an epidemiologist in Mexico City, jogs near his home in the southern part of the capital. He says it's hard to run on the city's streets. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption

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Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR

In Diabetes Fight, Lifestyle Changes Prove Hard To Come By In Mexico

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A family sells pastries in Mexico City. As Mexicans' wages have risen, their average daily intake of calories has soared. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption

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Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR

How Diabetes Got To Be The No. 1 Killer In Mexico

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Members of a search group carry the coffin of Pedro Huesca as they walk to a cemetery in Veracruz, Mexico, on March 8. Huesca, a police detective, disappeared in 2013 and was found in a mass grave. His remains were among more than 250 skulls found over the past several months in what appears to be a drug cartel mass burial ground on the outskirts of the city of Veracruz, prosecutors said. Felix Marquez/AP hide caption

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Felix Marquez/AP

With Murders On The Rise, 2017 On Track To Be One Of Mexico's Deadliest Years

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The newspaper Norte announced its closure in bold letters, with a front-page letter from its owner explaining that the violence against journalists in Juarez and elsewhere in Mexico made the paper's continued existence untenable. Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters hide caption

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Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Activists hope a provocative new campaign will prod male riders of Mexico City's public transit system to change behavior toward female transit riders. Mitsumasa Kiido/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Mitsumasa Kiido/Screenshot by NPR

Scenes from inside greenhouse No. 2 at Wholesum Farms Sonora. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Amid Talk Of Tariffs, What Happens To Companies That Straddle The Border?

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