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A member of a migrant caravan from Central America kisses a baby as they pray in preparation for an asylum request in the U.S., in Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico. Edgard Garrido/REUTERS hide caption

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Edgard Garrido/REUTERS

Central American asylum-seekers ride a bus to Tijuana on Wednesday, while passing through San Luis Rio Colorado along the U.S.-Mexico border. Hundreds of immigrants, the remnants of a caravan of Central Americans that began almost a month ago, set out on the last leg of their journey north in Mexico. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

The Mexican ambassador to the United States, Gerónimo Gutiérrez, speaks at a news conference at the Mexican Embassy in Washington on March 9, 2017. Aaron Bernstein/Reuters hide caption

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Aaron Bernstein/Reuters

Mexican Ambassador To U.S. Predicts Caravan Will 'Conclude' Within Days

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Mexican Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray says Mexico works with the U.S. on migration every day, in an apparent response to President Trump's recent tweets. He's seen here during a news conference in Mexico City in February that included then-U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. Henry Romero/Reuters hide caption

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Henry Romero/Reuters

People take part in the commemoration of International Women's Day in Mexico City on March 8. The national public security department's statistics show that more than 41 percent of women over the age of 15 have experienced some sort of sexual violence. Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alfredo Estrella/AFP/Getty Images

Mexico's #MeToo Faces Backlash After Celebrities Air Accusations Of Rape And Assault

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Mexicali Resiste members chat outside their encampment in front of Baja California's government offices in Mexicali. From left to right, Alberto Salcido, Francisco Javier Trujillo, Mauricio Villa, Jesus Galaz Duarte and Jorge Benitez. Alex Zaragoza hide caption

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Alex Zaragoza

Presidential candidate and front-runner Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador delivers a speech during a rally in Guadalajara on Feb. 11. On Wednesday, he said of Cambridge Analytica: "Now that it's a worldwide scandal, people are finally paying attention." ULISES RUIZ/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ULISES RUIZ/AFP/Getty Images

In Mexico, Candidates Move Away From Cambridge Analytica

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Students sit in an open area after their school was evacuated in Veracruz, Mexico, on Friday, after a magnitude 7.2 earthquake. Later Friday, 13 people died after a helicopter surveying the damage near the epicenter crashed. Felix Marquez/AP hide caption

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Felix Marquez/AP

Master guitar maker Arnulfo Rubio Orozco holds up his latest project. It's taken him a month to craft this guitar with pearl accents and wood from southern Mexico. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

A Town In Mexico Sees Guitar Sales Soar Thanks To The Movie 'Coco'

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Line workers sort freshly cut avocados at Frutas Finas packing plant in Tancitaro. Forty-five percent of the world's avocados come from Mexico. Eighty percent of avocados consumed in the U.S. come from Mexico, the majority from the small mountain town of Tancitaro. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

Blood Avocados No More: Mexican Farm Town Says It's Kicked Out Cartels

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Ocellated turkeys stand out for their bright blue heads and iridescent feathers. They're still around the Yucatan today. Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

Former Mexican President Vicente Fox spoke with NPR about his book, Let's Move On: Beyond Fear & False Prophets. The book highlights the North American Free Trade Agreement between the U.S., Mexico and Canada. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Former Mexican President To Trump: 'If You Want To Build A Wall, Waste Your Money'

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Spent bullet casings litter a road after authorities reported a gunbattle outside Mazatlan, Mexico, in July 2017, a year marked by the highest homicides in at least decades. Mario Rivera Alvarado/AP hide caption

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Mario Rivera Alvarado/AP