Mexico Mexico

This screen grab of video from a security camera, dated July 11 and released by Mexico's National Security Commission, shows the man Mexican authorities say is Guzman inside his cell at the Altiplano maximum security prison, looking at the shower floor shortly before escaping through a tunnel below. AP hide caption

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AP

A Visit To El Chapo's Prison Cell (Now That He's Gone)

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Top Official Says Inside Help Was Likely In 'El Chapo' Escape

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Maximum Security Not Enough As Mexican Drug Lord Stages Second Escape

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Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is escorted to a helicopter in handcuffs by Mexican navy marines at a navy hanger in Mexico City after his capture last year. Mexico's security now say Guzman has escaped from a maximum security prison for the second time. Eduardo Verdugo/AP hide caption

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Eduardo Verdugo/AP

Fernando Urias (left) and Victor Manuel Aguirre kiss after they learned they were allowed to marry, during a protest outside the municipal palace in the northern border city of Mexicali, Mexico, on Jan. 17. Alex Cossio/AP hide caption

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Alex Cossio/AP

How Mexico Quietly Legalized Same-Sex Marriage

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Concertgoers take photos of the band Intocable at a concert in Juarez, Mexico last year. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

The Violence Subsides, And Revelers Return To Juarez

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Pressed For Time? Try Hiring A Body Double

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State police officers patrol a highway between Ciudad Victoria and Matamoros, in northeast Mexico, in 2011. Mexico's drug and turf wars have descended on the once tourist friendly border town of Matamoros. Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/AP

Matamoros Becomes Ground Zero As Drug War Shifts On Mexican Border

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Reproduction of a letter to the National Commission of Human Rights from criminals, drug dealers, murderers and kidnappers in "El Altiplano," Mexico's highest-security prison. Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images

Julio Cesar Chavez at his home in Tijuana, Mexico. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

Ex-Boxing Champ Steps Back Into Spotlight As A Face Of Addiction

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