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Mexico City Mayor-elect Claudia Sheinbaum cast her vote in the capital city on July 1. She and many women won posts in local governments and legislatures across the country. Bernardo Montoya/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bernardo Montoya/AFP/Getty Images

Meet Mexico City's First Elected Female Mayor

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A hotel employee prepares coconut husks for recycling into rope at the luxury Soneva Fushi island resort in the Maldives. It's just one of many initiatives the resort is taking to reduce food waste. Amal Jayasinghe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Amal Jayasinghe/AFP/Getty Images

Tourists eat fried insects, including locusts, bamboo worms, dragonfly larvae, silkworm chrysalises and more during a competition in Lijiang, China. For Westerners, eating insects means getting over the ick factor. VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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VCG/Getty Images

Andrés Manuel López Obrador won Mexico's presidential election and celebrated Sunday night with his supporters in Mexico City's Zócalo Square. Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images

Mexico's Next President Gets 'Respectful' Call From Trump After Huge Win

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Claudia Sheinbaum, the leading candidate for mayor of Mexico City and Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, the frontrunner for president, attend the final event of the 2018 campaign in Mexico City on Wednesday. "Just because I might look like a skinny scientist doesn't mean I'm not going to crack down on crime here. I will," she told a crowd recently. Manuel Velasquez/Getty Images hide caption

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Manuel Velasquez/Getty Images

In Mexico's Elections, Women Are Running In Unprecedented Numbers

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Police drive through Ciudad Nezahualcóyotl, Mexico state. Brett Gundlock/Boreal Collective hide caption

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Brett Gundlock/Boreal Collective

Working The Night Shift For Mexico City's Bloody Crime Tabloids

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A hearse carrying the body of slain mayoral candidate Fernando Ángeles Juárez drives to a burial site last week in Ocampo, Mexico. Raul Tinoco/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Tinoco/AFP/Getty Images

The train known as "The Beast" passes by the Sagrada Familia shelter in Apizaco, Mexico. For many migrants, the train is the next step in their journey north. Alejandro Cegarra for NPR hide caption

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Alejandro Cegarra for NPR

Migrants Are Stuck In Mexico With Violence Back Home And 'Zero Tolerance' In The U.S.

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Albino Quiroz Sandoval is seen at age 10 (bottom right) with relatives including his parents and brother. Now in his 70s, he has been missing for more than a year. Alejandra Rajal for NPR hide caption

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Alejandra Rajal for NPR

Last Year, A Retired Mexican Schoolteacher Vanished. His Family Still Seeks Answers

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Roberta Jacobson testifies before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in May 2015. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Former U.S. Ambassador To Mexico Calls Trump's Immigration Policies 'Un-American'

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Andrés Manuel López Obrador, a veteran leftist, is running for president once again. Polls put his lead well into the double digits ahead of his nearest rival. Mexico's election is July 1. Hector Vivas/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Vivas/Getty Images

How Mexico's López Obrador Has Become The Man To Beat In His 3rd Run For President

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A man works in a steel distribution factory in Monterrey in northern Mexico last week, when the U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum took effect. Julio Cesar Aguilar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Julio Cesar Aguilar/AFP/Getty Images

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (seen here with President Trump in October) on Thursday called the argument that U.S. steel import tariffs were necessary for national security reasons an "affront" to Canada. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images