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Designer Isaac Mizrahi (left) embraces Robert D'Loren, CEO of Xcel Brands, which once manufactured 70% of its clothes in China. Today that's down to about 20%. The company now manufacturers in a variety of countries, including Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

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Brendan McDermid/Reuters

China Falls Out Of Fashion For Some U.S. Brands

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A special response team with Customs and Border Protection drills on the international bridge between Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, in the event that desperate migrants rush the port of entry. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Criminals Target Migrants In Mexico Seeking U.S. Asylum

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A group representing importers said it was gratified that the Trump administration is lifting the tariffs on Mexican tomatoes. But it cautioned that beefed-up inspections could act as another barrier to free trade. Anna-Rose Gassot/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna-Rose Gassot/AFP/Getty Images

A set of pink seesaws allowed people to share some fun along the U.S.-Mexico border wall this week. Here, a woman helps her little girls ride the seesaw that was installed near Ciudad de Juarez, Mexico. Christian Chavez/AP hide caption

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Christian Chavez/AP

This costume, with corn husks and feathers and paper flowers, is worn by a member of a dance group that gathers in cemeteries and other places to mark Day of the Dead festivities (called Xantolo, the word written above the mask). The idea of combining a skeletal mask with European fashion was devised by the Mexican artist Jose Guadalupe Posada, who lived in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Phyllis Galembo hide caption

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Phyllis Galembo

Guatemalan migrant Lety Pérez embraces her son, Anthony, while pleading with a Mexican National Guard member to let them cross into the United States, near Juárez, Mexico, on Monday. Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters hide caption

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Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Tania and her husband, Joseph, initially had to stay just across the border in Mexico under a Trump administration program that requires thousands of people to wait in northern Mexico cities while their immigration cases are heard in U.S. courts. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Joaquin Guzmán, also known as "El Chapo," was sentenced Wednesday to a life term in prison plus 30 years. After the sentencing in a Brooklyn courthouse, U.S. attorneys and other officials greeted the media, including Ariana Fajardo Orshan, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Florida. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

Mexican Drug Kingpin 'El Chapo' Is Sentenced To Life Plus 30 Years In U.S. Prison

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Central American migrants and a Spanish journalist ride a makeshift raft across the Suchiate River from Tecún Umán in Guatemala to Ciudad Hidalgo in Chiapas state, Mexico, on June 11. Quetzalli Blanco/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Quetzalli Blanco/AFP/Getty Images

Mexico Is Overwhelmed By Asylum Claims As It Ramps Up Immigration Enforcement

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An employee works at a wiring harness and cable assembly manufacturing company in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, that exports to the U.S. in 2017. The auto industry says threatened tariffs would play havoc with supply chains. Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters hide caption

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Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Ohio To Juárez And Back Again: Why Tariffs On Mexico Alarm The Auto Industry

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Trucks are seen heading into the United States from Mexico along the Bridge of the Americas in El Paso, Texas, on Tuesday. U.S. industries say President Trump's threatened tariffs on goods from Mexico raised uncertainty just as they were looking forward to a new trade agreement. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

White House's About-Face On Mexican Trade A 'Gut Punch' To U.S. Businesses

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"I think Mexico will step up and do what they should have done," President Trump said at a press conference with British Prime Minister Theresa May after a meeting with her at 10 Downing Street. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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WPA Pool/Getty Images