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President Johnson and Mexican President Gustavo Di­az Ordaz, with their wives, celebrate the dedication of the Chamizal Monument in Juarez, Mexico, on Oct. 28, 1967. The monument signified the international boundary marker between the two countries, designated in 1964. Yoichi Okam/Courtesy of the LBJ Presidential Library hide caption

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Yoichi Okam/Courtesy of the LBJ Presidential Library

50 Years Ago, A Fluid Border Made The U.S. 1 Square Mile Smaller

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Waves hit the coast of Los Cabos, Mexico, on Sunday as Hurricane Odile nears landfall in the largely tourist area of the Baja California peninsula. Victor R. Caivano/AP hide caption

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Victor R. Caivano/AP

Migrants at a shelter in southern Mexico say that Mexico's interior checkpoints are making it harder to travel north. Some have given up on reaching the U.S. and are trying to stay in Mexico. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

Mexican Crackdown Slows Central American Immigration To U.S.

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A man looks out towards the US from the Mexican side of the border fence that divides the two countries in San Diego. The U.S. Border Patrol says it has seen about a 60 percent drop in the number of Central Americans apprehended at the border. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Border Patrol Apprehending Fewer Central Americans

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Immigrants run to jump on a train in Ixtepec, Mexico, during their journey toward the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama wants nearly $4 billion in emergency funds to deal with the tens of thousands of children from Central America who've been crossing the border. Eduardo Verdugo/AP hide caption

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Eduardo Verdugo/AP

Time Running Short For Congress To Agree On Border Bill

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Reny Pineda was born in Michoacan, Mexico, but grew up in Los Angeles. In 2010 he returned to his homeland, and joined a vigilante battle against a ruthless cartel ruling the region. Now the Mexican government has ordered the civilian militias to disband, and Pineda picks lemons in this orchard. Alan Ortega /KQED hide caption

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Alan Ortega /KQED

Migrant Heads Home To Mexico — And Joins Fight Against Cartel

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Rowan Jacobsen, in the canoe, and Pete McBride and Sam Walton, on stand-up paddleboards, travel through the upper limitrophe of the delta reach (the section marking the U.S.-Mexico border). Before the dam release, Jacobsen described this parched riverbed as a scene of "Mad Max misery." The temporary flow of water helped bolster native habitats that survive here. Courtesy Fred Phillips hide caption

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Courtesy Fred Phillips

Well, I'll Be Un-Dammed: Colorado River (Briefly) Reached The Sea

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A migrant from El Salvador holds a map he received from church workers at the Mexico-Guatemala border. It shows the freight train schedules and routes to the U.S. border. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

A Flood Of Kids, On Their Own, Hope To Hop A Train To A New Life

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Migrants arrive at a rest stop in Ixtepec, Mexico, after a 15-hour ride atop a freight train headed north toward the U.S. border on Aug. 4. Thousands of migrants ride atop the trains, known as La Bestia, or The Beast, during their long and perilous journey through Mexico to the U.S. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

A Mexico City breast-feeding campaigned used posters featuring topless celebrities. At least "La Barbie," a female boxer (shown here), had her boxing gloves on. Via Latin Times hide caption

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Via Latin Times

Mexico City's Campaign To Encourage Breast-Feeding Backfires

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Workers sort through key limes at a packaging house in Apatzingan, Michoacan. More than 90 percent of limes imported into the U.S. come from Mexico. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

With Cartels On The Run, Mexican Lime Farmers Keep More Of The Green

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In this June 2013 photo provided by National Geographic, diver Susan Bird, working at the bottom of Hoyo Negro, a large dome-shaped underwater cave in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, brushes the Naia skull found at the site. Paul Nicklen/AP hide caption

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Paul Nicklen/AP

Ancient Skeleton In Mexico Sheds Light On Americas Settlement

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